Proposal for the Establishment of


The Eurasian
University


in


Liechtenstein



July 2011




Presented to
Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein
 


Contents

Page Number

1. Salient Features and Brief Particulars of the Proposal 3
2. Background 4
3. Need for The Eurasian University in Liechtenstein 5
4. Vocationalisation of Distance Learning 10
5. The Current Scene 16
6. Programme to be Offered under 20
Faculty of Environmental Sciences 21
Faculty of Social Sciences 22
Faculty of Information Technology 24
Faculty of Management Studies 25
Faculty of Interfaith Studies 27
Faculty of Engineering and Technology 28
Faculty of Oriental Medicine 30
Faculty of Modern Medicine 32
Faculty of Paramedical Studies 33
Faculty of Law 34
Faculty of Education 35
Faculty of Media Studies 36
Faculty of Dance, Drama and Music 37
Faculty of Fine Arts 38
Faculty of Fashion Technology and Cosmetology 39
Faculty of Agriculture 40
Faculty of Science 41
Faculty of Emerging Science and Technology 42
Faculty of Language Studies 43
Faculty of Library and Information Sciences 44
7. Draft Memorandum of Understanding 45
8. Draft of the Notification 46
9. Charter of The Eurasian University in Liechtenstein 47
10. Details of the Collaborating / Assisting Organisation 70
 


Salient Features and Brief Particulars of the Proposal

1. There is a proposal for the creation of The Eurasian University in Liechtenstein with a view to introducing vocational, job oriented and environment friendly educational training and research programmes at Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral levels. The draft of the Charter of The Eurasian University has been prepared by Ms. Ramona Pewestorf for the perusal of the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein.

2. Ms. Ramona Pewestorf is presenting this proposal to the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein for introducing need based educational programmes for the youth of Liechtenstein by designing a package for vocationalisation of careers.

3. The details of different vocational and job oriented programmes to be launched within three months from the date of Notification from the Principality of Liechtenstein are given in this proposal.

4. These programmes will be conducted under full time, part time, on-line and distance learning mode.

5. There will be a small campus in the beginning for offering these programmes but many students will be admitted in the distance learning courses.

6. As Ms. Ramona Pewestorf has already visited the Collabourating/Assisting Institution i.e. The Global Open University Nagaland in India, duly recognised by the Government of India and after visiting its website, internet and all electronic equipments for managing the programmes and as all the lessons will be provided to her in the form of printed occasional monographs and modules,The proposed Eurasian University is bound to get popularity for introducing programmes related to ecology, environment, disaster management, sustainable development, total quality management, journalism and mass communication, geo-informatics, bio-informatics, eco-tourism, hotel management, information technology, horticulture, forestry, pollution control etc.

7. A Memorandum of Understanding will be signed between the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein and The Eurasian University after approval of this proposal. A copy of the Draft MoU has also been placed in this proposal which may be suitably modified if necessary.

8. The Proposal may be examined and then the Charter of The Eurasian University, Liechtenstein may be approved by getting an enactment from the Parliament or by issuing a Notification through the Government for inviting the representatives of the World Institution Building Programme for establishing the University in Liechtenstein.

9. All higher education needs of Liechtenstein for introducing job oriented and vocational courses will be fulfilled with the help of The Eurasian University.

10. No funding is required from the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein as the promoters of The Eurasian University will be providing all support related to curriculum design, recruitment of faculty and payment to all the staff, library and laboratory development, publications, campus development etc.

11. This is a brief Proposal being submitted to the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein. Necessary changes may be made based on the suggestion given by the Authorities of the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein.


Background

Education is a cultural pursuit concentrating on the appropriate training of human beings. Like other truths of existence it is one of the values desired for their own sake. The purpose of all education is to provide a coherent picture of the universe and an integrated way of life and this cannot be a collection of distracting scraps but should be a harmony of pattern. It is by education that our reasoning faculties have to be nourished in order to allow our mind its freedom in the world of truth, our imagination for the world which belongs to art and our sympathies for the world of human relationships. These ideals which have been held dear by educationists from the days of Upanishads to the present times have yielded results not only in terms of mass education, mass motivation and mass enlightenment but also in terms of the flourishing of individual personality.

The entire world has come to a new adulthood in 2001. A silent revolution has been taking place for the last five decades. The multilateral spheres of industry, agriculture, education, political and social sectors of individual and national life are in a state of flux with ever-changing hues giving no signs of permanence. In the field of higher education, this revolution has resulted in a vocal yearning for a better life through equal opportunities in the context of the new egalitarian pulls and pressures. While we profess to give equal opportunities to all who desire and deserve an improvement in their educational lot, the set-up of the society is such and the opportunities are so few that the clamour continues and is vociferously heard in political rallies, mass congregations and platforms of public opinion.

In the sphere of education at the higher level, the number of colleges has increased manifold in the last fifty years and so has the population. The increase in the number of institutions of higher education or the number of seats in these institution has, however, not kept pace with the increase in the ever-growing long queues of candidates eligible for admission to various courses. For educationists and planners there were two ways to get out of the impasse. They could choose to curb the tendency of eligible candidates to join institutions of higher learning by tightening up admission rules and other criteria, thus debarring a great number of those who deserve but cannot get a seat in a course of study. This naturally would result in a vast section of legitimate aspirants for higher studies remaining outside the portals of a University - condemned to their routine life-patterns and careers which they chose not because they wanted them but because of the relentless socio-economic compulsions which made them give up their studies after their school. The other way was a novel one - to provide higher education to the very doorstep of these aspirants spread over the large land mass of India. Instead of the thirsty coming to the well, to translate an Indian idiom, the well walked up to the thirsty !

Some experimentation was done with the first alternative. Water-tight rules were made by universities to discourage a large percentage of those who, otherwise, were eligible in every respect to claim age of those who, otherwise, were eligible in every respect to claim admission to a course. This is the usual norm in case of science courses and professional studies where, naturally, for want of laboratory and other facilities, the number could not be allowed to swell to disproportionate dimensions. Correspondence studies as a form of distance teaching was the other alternative. It began not merely as a necessity but as the sure panacea for the various ills connected with what has been called "a spread of education at an explosive speed, at all-levels, and in all directions."

In the following pages, there is a detailed description regarding the establishment of a full-fledged University in Liechtenstein for launching vocational and job oriented courses for enabling the local and the foreign residents to acquire additional qualifications with a view to becoming job givers rather than job seekers.


Need for The Eurasian University

Europe and Asia have been pioneers in promoting higher and technical education. It is for the last 4000 years that innovations have taken place both in Europe as well as in Asia. It is in fitness of things that Europe and Asia unite together to give birth to a new University in one of the most advanced as well as the smallest countries of the world i.e. Liechtenstein.

The professional or tutorial discourse, popularly known today as the 'lecture' was a medieval invention designed for the serious students who were too poor to buy extensive books and who had not access to a library. This made it necessary for them to listen to a person who was familiar with books. We are no longer in that situation. Education, in the modern world, has come to mean - what has been called - 'guided reading'. The essential job of the teacher, particularly at the University level, is to direct students to do the work themselves and solve their problems in an informal manner. Not only the protagonists of non-formal education but progressive educationists all over the world hold the view that the lecture method of instruction might have been useful in the past, but in the modern context it tires the teacher and leaves the student uninterested and often hostile. They argue that the students may admire the eloquence of their college teachers, but in the process they relapse into a state of intellectual passivity. Again, the lecture method is such that the lecturer's prime concern in his subject rather than his audience. The average college teacher cares little whether his listeners actually benefit from his exposition. He is only concerned with the accurate exposition of his subject. It is indeed a fact that in the context of 'essay type' questions which are invariably set in the question papers at the end of a term, students turn to other sources of study 'primarily to cram and in this invidious process forget' or even 'un-learn', what their teachers had been talking throughout the year.

Teachers as pedagogues have to deliver classroom lectures. Their work quantum is measured in terms of 'hours'. In all universities in India, unless there are exceptions, a period runs into an hour. In colleges, however, a period is usually of 40 or 45 minutes' duration. While at the university level, a teacher is supposed to meet his classes every day at the same hour, the compactness of the time-table at the under graduate college level makes it necessary for a teacher to have his periods with different classes scattered over a span of 3 to 5 hours. In both cases, however, the entire course is supposed to be covered in a fixed number of lectures during a whole session. Where more than one teacher is assigned to a single class for teaching the same course, the work is divided in such a way that the students get their course of study 'finished' at least twenty days before the commencement of the examination.

The quantum of work for teachers at the undergraduate level is fixed, at 24 periods or 16 hours a week. The week consists of seven days. In the universities, however, it is the hierarchical order of seniority that determines the quanta of work for various categories of teachers. While a professor who is also the Head of the Department is required to teach 8 periods a week, (many of them do not teach more than 4 periods, and consider 'research guidance' to be their sole prerogative), a Reader is supposed to teach 8 periods and a Lecturer 12 periods a week. Of this, roughly one half of the periods is devoted to classroom lectures, while the rest constitute - what has been called - 'seminars' or 'tutorials'. Any one who has seen university teacher at work should know that while students attend their lectures on pain of penalty and for the fear of accumulated shortage of lectures at the term-end, they rarely turn up for their seminars or tutorials. Even when one or two zealous ones do come for the purpose, the teachers prefer to ask them to leave their written assignments for correction and go away.
In the classroom there is hardly any scope for discussion. It is a one-way traffic, and the teacher has no time for entertaining a doubt or two from a vocal student. "Discussion is also inhibited by the fact that many students are genuinely not interested in their course. Most of them enrol at colleges only for the certificate to be obtained at the end of the course."

As things stand at present, there is hardly any interaction between teachers and students either at the undergraduate or at the postgraduate level. The student goes to the classroom without any inkling of what a particular teacher is going to teach in a particular period. The English teacher decides for himself whether he would take up a poem from the anthology of poetry or a prose piece from a similar anthology prescribed for an undergraduate course. The same is true of a teacher social sciences. The choice of a subject or a topic is made by him without prior notification to his students. Similarly, at the postgraduate level it is the teacher who has the advantage of entering the classroom, ill-equipped or well-equipped, without fear of the students knowing before hand what exactly is in store for them on a particular day. Again, since lectures are supposed to be delivered in the medium of English and a majority of undergraduate students are not well-versed in that language, most of the lecture goes over the head of the students.

Again, in States and the regional language where a three-language formula governs the medium of instruction (English, Hindi), it is mixed class of students opting for one of the three media, the teacher has to alternate between English, Hindi and the mother-tongue in the same breath. His lecture is a curious mixture of terms and phrases which alternate, change their meaning and sense, and occasionally border on confusion. However, since the job is to be done, it is done. Since courses of study presuppose books prescribed for study and this is done by respective Boards of study in different subjects, extra-academic considerations are often made for continuation of books written by favourites over periods as long as seven years. This, indeed, is a boom for the classroom lecturer because they can articulate themselves without much preparation, term after term, and year after year. "The teachers' own admissions in this respect strengthen the viewpoint that the level of undergraduate education and the manner in which instruction is organised make for stagnation of teachers. Seventy-two per cent out of 171 teachers interviewed for this study said it was not necessary to read much in order to teach at the first year. Forty-eight per cent thought it was not necessary to read even for teaching at the senior B.A. or B.Sc. level."

It is in this context that the Report of the Education Commission (1946-66) spoke of the deplorable state in the realm of formal education in this country. It said that the existing situation in higher education during the academic year broadly alternates between slackness and strain-slackness during the session, strain at the time of examinations. In many of the weaker colleges and universities, a majority of teachers teach mechanically and listlessly. The subjects in which they lecture do not often involve their intellectual passion. They do not usually have a part in the formulation of the syllabus which they are required to teach, nor do they make - with a few exceptions - experiments in methods of teaching. There is little enthusiasm for learning or discovery of new truths because research is not considered an integral part of their duties, and whatever research is done is usually of unconvincing quality. In the absence of a 'research impregnated' atmosphere, even the intellectually ambitious younger members of the staff are soon caught up in the general atmosphere of indifference or cynicism. A large proportion of teachers find physical conditions unbearable.

In some of the institutions there are additional factors which are uncongenial for development of intellectual vitality. The hierarchical concentration of authority within the departments and colleges, the atmosphere of distrust between senior teachers and junior teachers, the cynicism, about administrative authorities, the unseemly conflicts about offices and positions and the attitude of envy towards persons of superior attainments - all have contributed to the deadening of the spirit of intellectual curiosity and adventure. Some of the members are diverted from intellectual concerns into intrigue and conflict over small administrative or financial prizes afforded by the Indian academic life. On top of all this, the bureaucratic structure within which teaching and research have to go hand in hand, the dependence on the approval of indifferent superiors, the elaborate procedure through which things have to go to become available to the aspirant for research or writing, have had a depressing effect on the morale of teachers and on the quality and quantity of their creative and meaningful academic work.

What is true of teachers is equally true of students. Not that they do not want to work. There are among those who do work in spite of the constraints and handicaps on account of indifferent and bad teachers. But many students come from comparatively or entirely uneducated homes and are ill-prepared at the secondary level to undertake genuine university work; they have little experience of independent study; their curiosity is unquickened and learning for them is mainly a matter of mechanical memorization. There is, as a rule, little discussion of intellectual matters with their teachers or fellow students; their main duty is considered to be able to attend dull lectures usually given in a language which they understand inadequately. When the medium is an Indian language, there is dearth of suitable textbooks and supplementary literature necessary to achieve competence in their subjects. Many of them cannot be expected to read textbooks in English because it has not become for them the language of the library. The capacities of better students are not fully stretched by curricular offering or the stimulus which inspiring teachers could provide. In addition, a large majority of students are beset with financial worries which make concentration on academic work difficult.
The governance of most Indian universities is reverely out of date and in need of revision. Yet, practically nothing has been done to modernize the ways in which universities are administered. Simple matters of bureaucratic inefficiency and rather rigid hierarchical structure add to student frustrations as well as hinder improvement in higher education.

The failure of the formal system of education is again apparent when one looks at the examination results. In spite of large scale use of unfair means, the average percentage of 'pass' students remains negligibly low. There have been cases of this percentage remaining as low as 12 in some university examinations. Of the use of unfair means, suffice it to say that a university in the North put on 'trial' as many as 9,421 students (both belonging to the campus and to the affiliated colleges) and 'convicted' 35 per cent of them by debarring them from any university examination for two to three years !

This may seem an exaggerated picture of a situation which is indeed dismal, but to the optimists it still seems capable of salvation. However, those of us who have known college and university situation at first hand can say it with some amount of responsibility that picture is true. Taken all in all, the ideal of academic excellence is confined to a microscopic minority of teachers and students in the formal system of higher education in India who have to keep it alive against the downward pressure of discouraging circumstances. This situation has been in existence for a long time. In fact, for the past fifty years situation has deteriorated progressively. The problem indeed is old. What is new is the magnitude of the problem and its accentuation as a result of extraordinarily rapid expansion of higher education and the development of new expectations in the post-independence era. In the past the need for a better, more effective education was not felt so keenly because, so long as India did not supply the higher cadres of its own ruling class - or did so to a limited extent - the efficiency and effectiveness of its intelligentsia was of secondary importance from the point of view of the tasks it was expected to perform. Now that the responsibility for the progress of the country squarely rests on us, we cannot afford to plead any alibis.

The traditional method has failed - and has failed miserably. The system has suffered from an incapacity to generate a compelling tradition of intellectual work of its own. In a certain sense, every university system is to some extent alien to the culture in which it operates - it is more differentiated, more critical, more innovative than its environing culture. But what has come to stay in India as the traditional system of education in colleges and universities has failed not only in differentiating itself from the environing cultural traditions and in generating its own traditions - institutional, professional and disciplinary - but also because it has not risen to the other pinnacle, the goal of the service of the community by merging itself with the community's aspirations. So, it has neither served in an egalitarian way nor in the old egalitarian way in which the universities have functioned in the past.

However, it would be wrong to assume that all is lost. The system of higher education in India even now has sound and strong legs to stand on. A transplant in India of a model which was once upon a time good enough for Europe, this over-formalised system has outlived its utility in India. There is no doubt that the British Government in India in the nineteenth century needed native support in running its administration, judiciary, communications and for the diffusion of information chiefly for propaganda and dissemination of knowledge about the European way of life. Narrow as the motives were, the results were indeed very fruitful. Within four decades of the founding of first universities in India, not only a small number of outstanding Indian scientists and scholars produced but also, strictly from the British point of view, a class of 'educated Indians' came into being. This class could be looked upon as the stable and strong backbone of the raj. Westernised in its outlook, dress, speech and style of living, this elitist group indeed served the purpose for which, purely for historical and imperialistic reasons, it was helped in its birth.

When we achieved our independence, the need for a new educational system was often and forcefully stated by the national leadership. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, as back as 1948, while opening an educational conference, said : "Whenever conferences were held in the past to form a plan for education in India, the tendency as a rule was to maintain the existing system with slight modifications. This must not happen now. Great changes have taken place in the country and the educational system must keep pace with them. The entire basis of educational system must be revolutionised." Nehru himself was a thinker, not a doer. Nothing indeed happened in the intervening years. J.P. Naik, wrote in 1965 : "What has happened is merely an expansion of the earlier system with a few marginal changes in content and technique." Again : "In short, while we have talked of 'revolutionary changes', we have practised only a 'moderate reformisms'...."
It will be good to have a look at what steps should be taken to tackle the present situation and a remedial course of treatment.

The first and the most important step would be to abandon our exclusive reliance on the traditional system of formal education and to move in the direction of providing life-long education for all for creating a learning society. From this point of view

- education should cease to be considered as a one-shot affair meant for children and youth;
- all the three channels of education - full-time, part-time, and own-time - should be developed in every stage and in every sector of education and given equal status;
- education should cease to be looked upon as a school process : it should be a social process covering all learning that takes place, whether in or outside the schools;
- education should also cease to be the delegated responsibility of a profession and should become the direct social responsibility in which every individual is involved, both as a teacher and as a student;
- the right to learn should be assured to every individual, without any discrimination and with full equality of opportunity, and the individual learner should also receive all the support and facilities necessary for its effective exercise throughout life; and
- the non-formal sector which has been neglected in the past should be developed and blended with the formal sector in an integrated fashion to create a new system of education which will have the advantages of both the sectors and also eliminate the weaknesses which arise when these sectors are developed in isolation.

The idea is to established Eurasian University in Liechtenstein with a view to launching only job oriented and vocational courses in different areas of arts, science, commerce, crafts etc. to be offered through formal as well as non formal mode i.e. through conventional teaching like full time and part time besides distance learning correspondence courses.

The defining feature of distance learning is that one does not need to attend the awarding university or the institution in person. Eurasian University being opened in Liechtenstein will be aware of the conflict that people face between the need to work full time and the need to acquire and keep up to date a professional degree and qualification. Distance learning suits people for many different reasons. These could be family and financial circumstances, attending full time jobs, undergoing other academic and professional courses, being in business, industry and other entrepreneurial activities. The academic support given to a distance learning student varies from programme to programme and from institution to institution. However, the focus is on self study. In its simplest form, students receive basic academic guidance through specially written study materials, assignments and model questions.

The academic support is not the only support required. Without the support of family, colleagues and friends, studying for a qualification as an external student would be a great deal harder. Distance learning demands hard work, dedication and sacrifice. If there is one quality that successful distance learning students have in common, it's self discipline. Although studying through distance learning mode is usually cheaper than attending a full time course, students must make sure they choose a programme that offers value for money. Universities and Institutions offering professional job oriented qualifications must meet stringent quality standards and should be the same as those set for internal students.

Students and all those interested in getting admitted to a distance learning correspondence courses like the Bachelor of Science or Master of Science Degree in Ecology and Environment; Disaster Mitigation; Sustainable Development; Total Quality Management; Bio-Informatics, Geo-Informatics etc. should have the grit and determination for undergoing and successfully completing the entire programme for becoming scientists, activists and experts in the areas of Environmental Impact Assessment, Pollution Monitoring and Control, Natural Resources Conservation, Environmental Education, Risk Assessment and Disaster Management, Green Business Management, Global Warming, Island Development, Green Employment, Total Quality Management, Quality Methodology and Systems, Quality Assurance, Inspection Quality and Sampling Plans, Testing and Calibration Laboratories, Operations Research, Quality Auditing in Banking and Financial Services, Hospital and Medical Services, Publication and Graphic Technology, Documentation and Information, Automotive Components, Materials Management etc. Securing a Master's Degree qualification through distance learning being conducted under the aegis of The Eurasian University, Liechtenstein while continuing with other work may speak volumes about the ability to learn new skills, to balance workloads and to strive for excellence.

The rewards are great for the professional development of the participants of different courses of the proposed University in Liechtenstein. Those who will dedicate themselves into these programmes with full of zeal and enthusiasm are bound to be successful in designing a Masterplan Paradigm for environmental awareness for successfully managing the third millennium especially the twentyfirst century.

 



Vocationalisation of Distance Learning

The essence of the matter is that the existing educational apparatus has reached a point of saturation beyond which it can be stretched only with danger both to the system and to the economy of the country. While on the one hand the solution may lie in faster economic growth, on the other it lies in diversification of the modes of education which at present remain deeply embedded in the traditional soil. One way out is the expansion and steady growth of non-traditional modes. "So long as the basic imbalances persist, there is no escape from containing the enrolment within available resources while stretching the resources to the utmost through part-time and correspondence or distance education". The Education Commission in this connection observed : "An economy like ours can neither have the funds to expand higher education on this scale nor the capacity to find suitable employment for the millions of graduates who would come annually out of the educational system at this level on enrolment."

The Commission was of the view that admission to the institutions of higher education should be made selective. This view, no doubt tenable from one angle, was found unacceptable by political pundits who held the reigns of power. They opined that the development of a democracy primarily depends on the quality and quanta of education which a State can give to its citizens. Indeed, the observation had been made in almost all the five year plans.

Education is the most important single factor in achieving rapid economic development and technological progress and in creating a social order founded on the values of freedom, social justice and equal opportunity.... It has been one of the major aims of the Five Year Plans to expand and intensify the education effort so that from now on, in all branches of national life, education becomes the focal point of planned development.

It is a statistical fact that only one in every forty men of the age-group 20-25 now goes to the college. Even if the stipulated increase in the number of college-going students become a hard fact by 2000, the ratio of college-going and non-college-going students will not change. Thus every time 39 students will prefer not to go to a college, only one will do so. Will it be worthwhile or even desirable to shut the gates of colleges to some of the 25 young men or women out of a thousand of the relevant age-group in the Indian population who want to seek admission ? In an egalitarian society it becomes more of an imperative than a choice to throw open avenues of betterment to all those who desire. Whether or not they deserve is a question which should engage attention either in a totalitarian state or in an absolute, monarchical order of things. Naturally, therefore, the Report of the Education Commission (1964-65) had given detailed comments on the equalization of educational opportunities. It has said that inequalities of educational opportunities arise in various ways which include the non-location of institutes of higher learning in rural, hilly or backward areas. While the recommendation of the Commission was "this handicap should be overcome by the widest dispersal of educational institutions, consistent with economy and efficiency," it also noted with dismay that "another cause of inequality of educational opportunity is the poverty of large sections of the population and the relative affluence of a small minority" with the result that "even in the neighbourhood of an educational institution, children from poor families do not have the same chance as those who come from, richer ones". Among other recommendations such as the progressive abolition of fee, provision for free books and scholarship, the Commission stressed the need for the Indian universities to take upon their shoulders the task of community service, through adult education programmes, extension lectures, correspondence courses and establishment of evening institutions. About programmes of adult education, it said :
Another special responsibility of the Indian universities is to develop programmes of adult education in a big way, and to that end, evolve widespread network of part-time and correspondence courses. The universities have to provide these courses in all their faculties, not only as extramural preparation for their examinations, but also as programmes of in-service education if professional workers in all walks of life. General adult education programmes are also needed to create a unity of outlook and faith between the masses and the intelligentsia.

The concept of a university may be defined as "an organised and degree giving institution, intended for the study and advancement of higher branches of learning, self-governing in its nature, and, to a greater or lesser extent, national in scope". The university may further be defined as "a corporation or society which devotes itself to a search after knowledge for the sake of its intrinsic value". Neither of the two definitions enable it appropriate to include the 'methodology' or 'medium' of teaching to be of such intrinsic value to be incorporated in the definition of university. However, today's university has a greater role to play than - say - the ancient universities of Takshashila and Nalanda or stadium generale of Bologna, Salamanca, Paris, Oxford or Prague. Let us understand the point this way.
It is a national institution, hence it cannot keep itself aloof from the main currents of national life. If cannot become recluse in its 'ivory tower' of culture. It will have to bring its policies and programmes into line with social and national problems, and keep itself in contact with the needs of all sections of our population, well-educated and illiterate, workmen and labourers, artisans and farmers. In short, it should provide suitable extension programmes too. Thus, a university in Free India will have four main functions : (i) instruction, (2) research, (3) affiliation, and (4) extension.

Under 'extension', comes adult education programmes and community service. The initiation of correspondence courses is a part of the extension of the university to the doorstep of the receiver. It is the university that goes out into the community to meet its student and not the students who come to the university. Unless the university, without diverting its attention from higher goals of research and accumulation of knowledge, pays due attention to correspondence and continuing education, it is likely to end up as a study in decay. The University in essence is a living organism, and is inevitable subject to the principles of is a living organism, and is inevitable subject to the principles of evolution. It cannot remain static. To do so would be to perish.

In the USA, Carnegie Commission Reports (in thirteen volumes) suggest a blueprint for some fundamental academic reforms and reveal certain great new opportunities that lie before higher education. The major theme adumbrated therein relates to sufficient open access to opportunities for all who wish to have post-secondary education besides measures to overcome educational disadvantages due to race, sex, economic deprivation and inadequacies of prior schooling. Besides, the Open Door Community Colleges have been recommended to be spread across the nation with a view to providing for comprehensive type of education serving both academic and occupational interests. Stress has also been laid on encouraging the widespread use of the new educational technology to greatly enrich post-secondary education and to help people learn, as and when they wish, even beyond the traditional campus, to enable them to enhance their lives, professionally and academically. The new emphasis is on the development of individual human capabilities to enhance the quality of life in all its aspects and to enhance individual and social well-being.

What according to the Carnegie Commission Reports is good for U.S.A. is still better for India. An elementary proposition if the sociology of education suggests that education is an important channel to the social and economic rewards of society. It is essential to the economy and it is a large-scale and highly visible organisation. For these reasons education is controlled by the dominant groups of society so as to meet their definition of society's priorities.
It would not be far wrong to say that this is what exactly happened in the traditional system of education in India. At the university stage, more than 70 percent of the seats are taken by the top 5 percent of the social strata.

Educational development, particularly at the Secondary and higher stages, is benefiting the 'haves' more than 'have-nots'. This is a negation of social justice.
The elitist bias in higher education has indeed been more marked in India than in the western countries. It was quite appropriate in the British India for educationists to think of a three-fold-significance of the work of the Universities - teaching, research and service to the society. However, the position has changed considerably since then and new pulls and pressures of an egalitarian society committed to the programme of social welfare have made it abundantly incumbent upon the universities to expand this programme. The elitist bias in higher education can indeed be minimised through universal education which should bring the university out of its ivory-tower isolation to the very door step of the student. The three-fold programme of the traditional university own includes a fourth goal - the goal of adult literacy, converting itself into continuing education for the adult in the course of time.

The Education Commission once again paid attention to the problem and recommended in a later paragraph :

At present, a student at the undergraduate stage must either be admitted to a full-time basis or go without education altogether. This creates a great demand for full-time seats in colleges and leads to a deterioration of standards as the resources to provide all the seats needed are not available. Once solution to this is to keep full-time seats strictly limited on the basis of resources available and institute correspondence courses, part-time courses, evening courses etc. for those who aspire to a university degree but are not able to get admission to the regular courses. This device is being increasingly used in many countries such as the USA, the UK and Japan. The correspondence / distance education courses recently started by the many universities have proved to be a promising experiment and are producing satisfactory examination results.

Correspondence courses, in addition to the provision by Universities of regular part-time courses through evening colleges and other institutes, were visualised in the context of (a) an ever-growing number of students who want to seek higher education; (b) non-availability of seats in the existing colleges and university departments which have already reached a saturation point; (c) throwing open of opportunities of higher education to all who desire and deserve; (d) doing away with the need of opening institutions of higher education in remote corners, hilly areas and other places where a sufficient number of students may not be available and hence opening of colleges would be economically unwise; (e) providing dropouts a fresh start in their academic career if they have taken up jobs, and (f) relying mainly on the existing faculty of parent departments for designing courses and tailoring reading material for distant students thereby not adding considerably to the faculty strength.
At present, the parent universities which have established correspondence courses as multi-channel extension limbs have not taken into account the basic philosophical premise of correspondence education for giving them independence and autonomy from the inflexible course meant for regular students. There is a rigidity born of highbrow and stiff-collar attitudes. No attention has been paid, for example, to tailoring of new courses, flexible enough to have sufficient elbow room for academic reactivity, meant primarily for those 'academic orphans' who have failed to get seats in regular courses obviously on account of socio-economic compulsions. "The scope of correspondence education (in India) has remained narrow. It has got to be widened. For this purpose, new courses have to be designed keeping in mind the need of our society. Such courses should specially be linked to job requirements.

Though the aims of correspondence instruction and those of oral teaching are the same, the incitements, motives and methods differ. In oral teaching it is the established equation of the physical presence of the teacher and the taught in a given point in space and time which holds good only for that environment. In correspondence study, the equation of physical absence of oral communication makes it possible for the written and printed work to be employed as a vehicle for the dissemination of knowledge. Such a course of study transcends the physical limitations imposed on classroom teaching. It is with this end in view that governments and educational bodies have become increasingly aware of the possibilities offered by correspondence education and the record success of its programmes all over the world has strengthened the faith of educationists.

The traditional classroom teaching, as is evident, is a hang-over from the days of Plato and Aristotle. The golden age of Greek learning or the equally lustrous age of Indian scholarship in our hoary past conceptualised higher teaching as some thing fixed in the place where the wisdom-giver had his ashrama or his academy. The physical limitations of distance, scanty means of travel and lack of facilities for a number of students to work as in-scholars made it impossible for more than a selected few to sit at the feet of the master and learn. Nonetheless many flocked to the fountain-head to get wisdom. The very name Upanishadas (near sitting) symbolised the cadre of those who sat nearer to the wisdom-giver or the guru with their folded knees to imbibe his teaching. Suffice to say that but for the diligence of his pupils, the notes of Aristole's Poetics or Manu's code known as 'Manusmriti' and some other great works would have been lost to us. Education, throughout the intervening centuries, remained the prerogative and monopoly of those who could claim it by virtue of their higher birth or whole time life-long vocation. This indeed was true of the pre-Independence period because institutions of higher education were so few as to thwart the aspirations of many. But in spite of the great multiplication of the number of colleges as also their proliferation in the back belts of the known urban centres in India, the number of those who desire and deserve a seat in a higher study course has mounted manifold.

The socio-economic compulsions may thwart the aspirations of millions from higher education today. This particularly true of a big country like India with its large land-mass and teeming population living in rural areas. As it is, universities and affiliated colleges can function only in towns and cities, away from the interior rural landscape, isolating the student community living in villages from the process of continuing education. Another socio-economic compulsion which cripples the aspirations of a large body of our youth is the seasonal employment or under-employment in a vocation which they have either inherited as their partimony (though a rigid caste-system which still holds its sway) or for the reason that they are compelled to eke out an existence solely because they are born at a certain place. Hill-folk in India, as sociologists will testify, still retain almost a racial compulsion to get their last rites at the place of their birth. The bulk of these under-employed, partly-employed or seasonally-employed young men and women cannot pursue a regular course of study in a college whereby they have to leave their village based life for a three-year sojourn in a city. It is befitting, therefore, that correspondence education should cater to this significant but ignored segment of humanity by reaching out to millions who work for their living and to those who do not have an institution in their geographical proximity.

A change in the educational technology, of which the introduction of correspondence or distance education is but a significant part, becomes imperative seen in the context of the education scene in India. This question has indeed received very little consideration at the hands of planners in the last fifty years and it was only with the advent of the nineties that a serious note was taken by policy-framers and planners to the central level while States which zealously guarded the realm of education as a State subject merely wasted time.

A typical class of one teacher attached to 60 or 80 students using textbooks is the prototype of the traditional classroom method. Absence of programmed learning though which teaching-learning apparatus could have been systematised leads to further pigmentation of an already hardened system in which formal education, apronstring-tied to degrees or diplomas linked with job-qualifications, rather than with job-requirements, become the summum bonum of education. Programmed learning within or on the periphery of the framework of a formal system can, by itself, reduce some of the burden. It can systematise learning considerably in many of its aspects and increase average class size of pupil-teacher ratio. Its requirements indeed would be highly professionalised manpower of programmes which would substitute for any very great improvement on the present formal education-intellectual competence of the teacher or the receptivity calibre of the pupils.

Education being a labour-intensive industry in the context of a developing country like India, a rapid technical change requires higher capital layout. Denied this, we have to fall back upon the home-made and indigenous systems which may come up to the modern level if they are given a fair deal of help and assistance. Whether it is the stress on productive work (earn while you learn - a cliche, but also a hard reality), or the fundamental change in the medium of teaching, the system has to be carried along in the changes of educational technology relevant to the Indian situation. But it is obvious that rapid technical change has to be carried out in education if, within the resources constraints that exist, much larger educational outcomes are sought to be achieved.

In a country of the magnitude of India, teacher's salaries alone amount to as much as 83.5% of the total educational outlay. Figures calculated reveal that consumption expenditure (teacher's salaries, scholarships etc.) and investment expenditure (buildings, equipment, library books, laboratories etc.) have a discordant ratio. It was found that the percentage of 'consumption expenditure' to the total university expenditure increased from about 41 in 1947-48 to 52 in 1965-66. It further jumped to 64 in 1971-72, 73 in 1974-75 and 83.5 in 1998-99, after the revision of the grades of university teachers.

Seen in real terms, the position is that idle children and idle adults who are eating and living at a level lower than the poverty line in most cases, have to be bunched together in order to bring them into the fold of education. It is, however, not they who finance education, for they obviously cannot, it is the state which has to do so. It has also been the time-honoured practice that higher the level of academic courses pursued, higher still is the public subsidy for the student trainee.
Judging from the scheme of social expenditure on education and training, a regular college student in a College of Arts or Science costs something like US$ 100 per annum to the Government or the Management, without giving anything by way of return except that the gets a degree after completing a course and qualifying an examination. A correspondence student literally costs less than one-fourth to the Government or the Management. Since most of the institutions are run on a non-profit-no-loss basis (their surpluses are occasionally carried forward to the next year or become a source of general revenue for the University). There are normally no grants to meet deficit-on-account except where last years' surpluses are available. This position is, however, in for a welcome change in as much as many universities have now started meeting the on-account deficit of their correspondence course. A correspondence student, again, is not only not a liability on the state, but is a positive asset to the society.

However, while the fact remains that correspondence course can finance their own programmes from the revenue resources of fees from the students and do not become a dead burden on the sponsoring universities, it should not create an impression that such courses should eventually become commercial concerns running at a profit and constitute a permanent revenue source for the general budget of the university. Any part of its resources should at no time be regarded as surplus and utilised for purposes of the university unconnected with the correspondence courses institute. The surplus money should be diverted for more and more of developments and charitable purposes like earmarking substantial amounts for grant of fee concession or total exemption of fee or for scholarships to deserving but financially crippled sections of students of which there is a large number.

Correspondence distance education has come of age in India. However, no serious attempt has been made to evaluate the work and efficacy of the system in catering to the needs of thousands of students who cannot pursue a regular course of study. Institutes of Correspondence Education Centres of Distance Education have been working more or less as extension service agencies of universities which have created them. They not only teach the same courses of study but also use tools and skills which still retain their musky odour of the classroom system. Since the examinations for regular students and correspondence students are one and the same, the students have to be given examination-oriented study programmes to make them show an equal rating with regular students. This forces designers of lessons and other reading material to fall back upon the time-honoured and time-abused system of written notes which some-times border on the realm of cheap 'digests' available in market. In some cases, even the question-answer form is used to give the correspondence students readymade material for use in the examination.

Evaluation of any educational programme which has successfully run for over a decade becomes one of the categorical imperatives of a system if the system has to look to the future needs of a changing situation. This applies to correspondence education as much as to the traditional modes of education.

However, in the last decade, different Committees on distance education have been able to review the working of only a few universities. Since no appreciable amount of data is available with the Governments about the state of correspondence education in various universities (for the reason that the august body does not bother about a university unless funds are asked for a specific reason, and except for non-recurring investment expenditure, the universities do not hope to get anything for expansion of correspondence education), there has been no serious effort in evaluating the work of correspondence institutes. Occasional meetings and seminars or workshops organised by different universities have, however, given to the participants opportunities for exchanging views on various subjects. One thing that has emerged from this exchange of view and comparison of notes is the widespread belief that unless correspondence institutes are considered autonomous institutes, allowed to run their own courses to give their own degrees, they will continue to be looked down upon and considered 'poor relations' of their traditional counterparts. This is in spite of the fact that the system of degree linked jobs makes it imperative for a job-seeking individual to have the same degree either regular or though correspondence course of study. If an overhaul has to be done, it shall have to be done to the entire fabric of eduction. A built-in element of flexibility in course of study which can be given only through correspondence education is the need of the hour.


The Current Scene

Correspondence implies that two or more parties are in contact with one another in writing. Consequently correspondence teaching is taken to mean teaching through the printed lessons sent by the teacher to the student in the course of which the student and the teacher are in regular contact with each other. Teaching by correspondence is a natural means of instruction if the instructor and the student are at a distance from each other. This distance is inevitable in the geo-economic context of India. A correspondence or distance educational study programme launched by a university thus fills the large gaps left unabridged by regular courses of study which presuppose the physical presence of the teachers and their students at a given place and time.

Correspondence education is not an entirely alien thing grafted on the time-hardened tree of traditional education. In the words of Renee F. Erods, it can be traced back to Plato whose Epistles are the first concrete instance of teaching through the written word. In the 19th century, the idea of using the genial agency of the post office for teaching European languages was put into active practice by Charles Touissant and Gustav Langenscheidt, a German and a Frenchman. They started a school in Germany for this purpose. In the U.S.A., the earliest pioneer of the Home Study Programme was Dr. William Rainey Harper in the Harvard University who authored the idea of starting a new project in 1892 for using the printed word as the medium of teaching. The project offered 39 different course by correspondence. The first enrolment was a total of 82; 5 students dropped in the very first month. Fourteen years later when Dr. Harper died, the enrolment in 297 different courses had gone up to 1587, and as many as 113 teachers were engaged in teaching by post.

By the middle of the twentieth century the experiment of correspondence education transcended the initial experimental stage and became a fundamental part of the educational edifice in the USA, Russia, Sweden, Japan, Australia, Great Britain, Germany and France.

Educational structure of the Russia, particularly since 1958, has developed an in-built and yet broad-based programme of correspondence education in addition to a network of evening schools and colleges ranging from secondary to university level and in all sectors of the educational pyramid including technical, specialised and vocational education. The total enrolment in correspondence courses in secondary education was 1,64,000 in 1960 which jumped to 2,00,700 in 1970. The universities and institutions of higher education have stable student population in correspondence courses, and students from as distant places as Siberia join courses offered by universities in Soviet Asian Republics. While major universities have their own departments of correspondence education, there are a large number of institutions exclusively operating correspondence courses. The All Union Correspondence Polytechnical Institute, which provides courses in technical subjects, has a very large enrolment. Even in 1960 about 25 per cent of the student body was studying through correspondence courses or in the evening shifts. The famed Leningrad University in the same year had an enrolment of over 7,000 students for correspondence courses and about 8,000 as day-scholars and resident students The University of Kiev enrolled over 5,000 for correspondence study programmes out of about 11,000 students enrolled with it. A survey of student population studying through the correspondence medium reveals that seventy percent of the courses thus offered are devoted to teacher training and allied teaching skills. Tens of thousands of teachers working in Russian schools are the alumini of correspondence courses and evening institutions. Besides, there is a network of - what has been called - "accelerated courses", "condensed courses" and the projects of the "School of the Prolonged Day."

Today, teaching by correspondence has become an accepted thing. It has obtained for itself a position of power and prestige in the educational realm of the world. There have been thirtyfive international conferences on correspondence education conducted by the International Council on Correspondence Education (I.C.C.E.) between 1938 and 1976. The success of correspondence education has silenced even its critics, and according to W.R. Young, since 1934, the teaching by correspondence has "become generally accepted in a great many countries of the world."

The scene as it obtains at present in U.K. is as optimistic as in USSR or USA. The Council for the Accreditation of Correspondence Colleges has accredited 33 colleges and institutes which are its integral members. The Council is a voluntary organization which was set up in 1969 by the Government and Correspondence Colleges jointly. The total student enrolment in 1976 was between 350,000 and 410,000, the stable figure being something like 382,000. The courses offered by these colleges cover almost all areas and disciplines including technical, medical and engineering courses, besides courses in Arts, Sociology, General Education, Chartered Accountancy, Insurance, Civil Service, Law, Business Administration, Distributive Trades and Management, Agriculture, Journalism, Architecture, Interior Decoration, Salesmanship, Nursing, Home Science - both at the graduate and postgraduate levels. The college known for their high student response and quality of instruction include : Wolsey Hall, Oxford, The Chartered Insurance Institute, London, College of Law, Correspondence Tuition Service, Guidgord, Surrey, H. Foulks Lynch & Co. Ltd., London, Metropolitan College and Metropolitan College of Law, St. Albans, Herts., The School of Accountancy and Business Studies, Glasgow, Medical Correspondence College, London, etc. etc.

Of these, to take one example, Wolsey Hall, Oxford, was started as far back as 1874. Besides the two G.C.E., 'O' and 'A' Examinations (advanced and lower level) which include hundreds of subjects, this college prepares students for degree courses in arts and science. Over a dozen professional courses are also offered to the students. The total number of students enrolled with Wolsey Hall, Oxford, range between twenty thousand and twenty-five thousand. About 55% students are from U.K. and the rest from overseas.

However, it is the Open University London which caught the imagination of many a planner in developing countries. The idea of a University in the Air was first mooted by Mr. Harold Wilson in a speech in Glasgow in 1963. The report of the Planning Committee was finalized in early 1969. Technically the university emerged into being at a ceremony in the building of the Royal Society on 23 July 1969 when the First chancellor of the University was installed in office. By January 1971, about 183 full-time teachers were in place and more than 400 others took care of the students' academic problems as part-time 'tutors'. The student population in the Open University courses includes housewives, armed forces personnel, administrators and managers, technicians, farmers, miners, shopkeepers and school dropouts.

Hermods, Malmo (Sweden) is a world-known institution started as a private school by two educationist-founders in 1898. It was only recently that status of an autonomous foundation was restored to it. It has no state aid and as such is the reverse of the Open University which is completely state-aided. The motto of Hermods is "progress of Perish". The annual budget is about 44 million Kronas (Sweden) i.e., about four million Sterling. It has a permanent faculty and a set of editors which number about 70. The institute offers about 500 courses, mostly preparing for school examinations but about half a dozen dealing with college studies. The University of Lund holds the examination fro the college students and awards degrees. The G.C.E. examinations are run and official certificates are issued by Hernmods. The total number of students ranges between 65,000 to 100,000.

While France does not occupy the leading most place in the fraternity of correspondence education programmes in the world, it has the pride of place in combining the printed word and the recorded word. The Centre National De Tele-Enseignement, Vanves, Paris, has an enrolment of about 87,000 students with its head office, while the five provincial units at Grenobie, Lille, Rouen, Toulouse and Lyon have a total enrolment of about 75,000 students. The project is government-aided with a budget of fifty million new francs a year. About 50,000 records are sent free and as many as 14,000 tapes are supplied to the students on payment during their course of study. A record two million sheets are cyclostyled or photo-copied daily. The staff in the Centre at Paris has 502 full-time members in the administrative sector and 1480 regular and wholetime staff in the academic area. The staff in the other five centres has a strength of about 2200 members.

The scene in USA needs only one glance to know its rich content and large range. Chicago State College and North-Eastern Illinois State College are members of a 20-College consortium "University Without Walls" programme under a 415,000-dollars grant from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. There are no degree requirements, no prescribed time for getting a degree and unlimited opportunities to learn outside the classroom and the campus. Each student designs his own individualized programme, with guidance of a faculty adviser based on his own interests. The programme is based on two central principles; (a) that relevant learning can take place in many locations, in the classroom, on the job, in individual work projects and in the give-and take of seminar discussions; and (b) that a variety of geographical locations can broaden a student's horizons and help him gain perspectives that are not possible without the confines of a single campus.

University Without Walls (UWW) is a network of varied alternatives on different campuses which emerged from a proposal of some 100 professors attending Project Change over in the summers of 1967-69. Out of these, sessions emerged the plan of the 'University Without Walls' designed and fostered by the Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities, financed by grants from the Government. The Ford Foundation also lent a helping hand in it.

Though a recent phenomenon, correspondence education in India is not something unusual or uncommon, Beginning its humble role in 1962 with Delhi University offering courses in B.A. arts, it has assumed a gigantic role for itself in the university education. More than 100 universities now offer courses in different disciplines of arts, commerce, education, laws, and languages. In addition to the accredited universities, institutes of national and regional standing offer various refresher and in-services courses by correspondence for their distant students. Like the degrees awarded by universities running correspondence courses, institutes with statutory control of the State or the Central Government, also award their own degrees and diplomas to correspondence students and these are recognised by various employment agencies including Government departments.

Presently, both the Open Universities as well as the Conventional Universities have initiated hundreds of programmes through distance learning for helping the students. These universities run the correspondence courses through their directorates of correspondence courses or institutes / centres for distance education.
In order to run these centres successfully, the following points should be considered and remembered on a continuing basis for bringing efficiency and productivity :

1) Job oriented programmes.
2) User friendly lessons.
3) Publicity and public relations.
4) Proper counselling.
5) Periodical despatch of lessons and other materials.
6) Proper communication between the students and the institution.
7) Periodical assignments and progress monitoring.
8) Survey of credibility of the courses.
9) Timely examination and results.
10) Preparation of course materials and updating.
11) Seminars and workshops.
12) Contact programmes.
13) Website design and management.
14) Electronic mail.
15) Lessons and books on CD Rom.
16) New programmes on emerging topics.
17) Evaluation of ongoing programmes.
18) Location of counselling, contact and examination centres.
19) Collaboration with independent institutions.
20) Institution building strategies for further growth.

The Eurasian University, Liechtenstein may introduce full time and part time Bachelor's and Master's Programmes besides distance learning courses in India and other countries for having a competent cadre of young professionals in the fields of ecology, environment, pollution control, disaster mitigation and management, sustainable development, total quality management, bio-informatics, geo-informatics, information technology, business and hotel management, journalism and mass communication, eco-tourism etc. with a view to manage the third millennium global issues.
 


Programmes to be Offered

The Eurasian University, Liechtenstein will establish the following Faculties in order to launch different types of need based full time, part time, on-line and distance learning programmes :

1. Faculty of Environmental Sciences
2. Faculty of Social Sciences
3. Faculty of Information Technology
4. Faculty of Management Studies
5. Faculty of Interfaith Studies
6. Faculty of Engineering and Technology
7. Faculty of Oriental Medicine
8. Faculty of Modern Medicine
9. Faculty of Paramedical Studies
10. Faculty of Law
11. Faculty of Education
12. Faculty of Media Studies
13. Faculty of Dance, Drama and Music
14. Faculty of Fine Arts
15. Faculty of Fashion Technology and Cosmetology
16. Faculty of Agriculture
17. Faculty of Science
18. Faculty of Emerging Science and Technology
19. Faculty of Language Studies
20. Faculty of Library and Information Sciences


1. Faculty of Environmental Sciences
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis: Ecology and Environment, Disaster Mitigation,
External / Integrated) Sustainable Development, Ecological Philosophy, Ecological Tourism, Bio-Informatics, Ornithology.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis: Ecology and Environment, Disaster Mitigation, Sustainable Development, Ecological Philosophy, Ecological Tourism, Bio-Informatics, Ornithology.

3. M.Sc. / MA Master of Science / Master of Arts (by research / distance learning / full time / part time / summer sequential prog).
Areas of Specialisation :
Ecology and Environment
Disaster Management
Sustainable Development
Pollution Control
Environmental Education
Eco-Philosophy
Eco-Tourism
Environment Communication
Ornithology
Political Ecology

4. B.Sc. / BA Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Arts (by distance learning / full time / part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Ecology and Environment
Disaster Management
Sustainable Development
Pollution Control
Environmental Education
Eco-Philosophy
Eco-Tourism
Environment Communication
Ornithology

5. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Environmental Technologies
Green Management
Environmental Impact Assessment
Pollution Monitoring and Control
Environmental Laws

6. Certificate Certificate Courses (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Social Forestry

2. Faculty of Social Sciences
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Literature
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Human Rights, Duties Education, Conflict
External / Integrated) Resolution, Counselling, Peace Studies, Gandhian Studies, International Relations.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Human Rights, Duties Education, Conflict
Resolution, Counselling, Peace Studies, Gandhian Studies, International Relations.

3. M.Sc. / MA Master of Science / Master of Arts (by distance learning / full time / part time / summer sequential prog).
Areas of Specialisation :
Human Rights
Gandhian Studies / Thought
Ambedkar Thought
Heritage Management
Criminology and Forensic Science
Developmental Studies
Prayojanmulak Hindi
Police Administration
Rural Development
Entrepreneurship Development
Child Care and Development
Women's Studies
Public Administration
Archaeology
Cartography
Asian Civilisation
African Civilisation
American Civilisation
European Civilisation
World Civilisation
Nehruvian Thought
Intellectual Property Rights
South Asian Studies
West Asian Studies
South East Asian Studies
Central Asian Studies
Asian Studies
Canadian Studies
Japanese Studies

4. MSW Master of Social Work

5. B.Sc. / BA Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Arts (by distance learning / full time / part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Human Rights
Gandhian Studies / Thought
Ambedkar Thought
Heritage Management
Criminology and Forensic Science
Developmental Studies
Prayojanmulak Hindi
Police Administration
Rural Development
Entrepreneurship Development
Child Care and Development
Women's Studies

6. BSW Bachelor of Social Work

7. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Consumer Protection and Consumerism
NGO Management
Cosmetology
Correctional Administration
Development Administration

8. Certificate Certificate Courses (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Sports Journalism
Sports Management
Gender Justice


3. Faculty of Information Technology
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Computer Science, Information Technology,
External / Integrated) Computer Applications, Information Science, Electronics and Telecommunication, Software Systems, Software Engineering.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Computer Science, Information Technology,
Computer Applications, Information Science, Electronics and Telecommunication, Software Systems, Software Engineering.

3. M.Sc. / MCA Master of Science / Master of Arts (by distance learning / full time / part time / summer sequential prog).
Areas of Specialisation :
Master of Science (Information Technology)
Master of Science (Computer Sciences)
Master of Science (Software Engineering)
Master of Computer Applications


4. BCA / B.Sc. Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Arts (by distance learning / full time / part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Bachelor of Computer Application
Bachelor of Science (Information Technology)
Bachelor of Science (Computer Sciences)
Bachelor of Science (Software Engineering)

5. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Information Technology
Computer Techniques and Informatics
Systems Analysis and Design
Database Management Systems
Database Administration
Web-Design and Management

6. Certificate Certificate Courses (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Date Communication and Networking
C Language, C++
Visual Basic
JAVA


4. Faculty of Management Studies
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Management, Administration, Development,
External / Integrated) HRD, Entrepreneurship, Organisational Behaviour, Commerce, Marketing, Finance, Foreign Trade, Materials Management, Industrial Management, Bank Mgt.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Management, Administration, Development,
HRD, Entrepreneurship, Organisational Behaviour, Commerce, Marketing, Finance, Foreign Trade, Materials Management, Industrial Management, Bank Mgt.

3. MBA Master of Business Administration (by distance learning / full time / part time / summer sequential prog).
Areas of Specialisation :
HRD, International Business, Marketing Management, Information Technology, Financial Management, Health Care and Hospital Administration, Rural Management, Cooperative Management, Insurance Mgt., Bank Mgt.

4. MIB Master of International Business

5. MIns.B Master of Insurance Business

6. MFC Master of Finance and Control

7. MBE Master of Business Economics

8. M.Com Master of Commerce

9. MHRD Master of Human Resource Development

10. MHA Master of Hospital Administration

11. MTA Master of Tourism Administration

12. M.Sc. (Hotel Mgt.) Master of Science (Hotel Management)

13. BBA Bachelor of Business Administration (by distance learning / full time / part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
HRD, HRM, Entrepreneurship, Insurance, Rural Marketing, Finance, Advertising, Tourism, Small Business Management, Bank Management.

14. BHMCT Bachelor of Hotel Management and Catering Technology

15. BCam Bachelor of Computer Aided Management (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Computer Assisted Management, Software Systems and Management, Information Systems and Management, Computers Inn Management, e-Governance, Office Automation, Management Audit, Government in Business, Multinational and Transnational Corporations, Export Management, Financial Management, HRD.

16. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Agricultural Marketing, Pharmaceutical Marketing, Export Marketing, Sales Management, Marketing Research, Public Relations Management, HRN, Insurance Management, Cooperative Management, Financial Analysis, e-Commerce.

17. Certificate Certificate Courses (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Business Process Outsourcing, Investment Analysis, Production Management, Supply Chain Management.


5. Faculty of Interfaith Studies
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. / Th.D / DD Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / / Doctor of Theology / Doctor of Divinity
External / Integrated) Emphasis : Inter-Religious Studies, Theological Studies, Divinity, Religion and Culture, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Christianity, Bahaism, Sikhism.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Inter-Religious Studies, Theological Studies, Divinity, Religion and Culture, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Christianity, Bahaism, Sikhism.

3. MA Master of Arts (by distance learning / full time / part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Interfaith
Vedic Studies
Comparative Religion
World Civilization
Theology.

4. BA Bachelor of Arts (by distance learning / full time/part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Eco-philosophy and Eco-dharma
Inter-Religious Studies
Theology

5. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Vedanta Philosophy
Vedic Philosophy
Ancient Indian Culture
Christianity
Hinduism
Buddhism
Jainism
Bahaism
Zoroastrian
Sikhism
Confucians

6. Certificate Certificate Courses (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Christianity
Hinduism
Buddhism
Jainism
Bahaism
Zoroastrian
Sikhism
Confucians


6. Faculty of Engineering and Technology
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees
1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Engineering and Technology, Architecture,
External / Integrated) Civil, Construction, Electrical, Electronics, Environmental, Mechanical, Computer, Information Sciences, Bio-Technology, Bio-Informatics, Bio-Engineering, Chemical, Aeronautical, Dairy Technology, Genetics, Leather, Marine, Paper and Pulp Technology, Rubber, Textile, Polymer, Plastic, Petroleum, Oil Technology, Software Engineering, Fuel Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Mining Engineering, Nuclear Engineering / Technology, Sugar Engineering and Technology, Quality Engineering.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Engineering and Technology, Architecture,
Civil, Construction, Electrical, Electronics, Environmental, Mechanical, Computer, Information Sciences, Bio-Technology, Bio-Informatics, Bio-Engineering, Chemical, Aeronautical, Dairy Technology, Genetics, Leather, Marine, Paper and Pulp Technology, Rubber, Textile, Polymer, Plastic, Petroleum, Oil Technology, Software Engineering, Fuel Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Mining Engineering, Nuclear Engineering / Technology, Sugar Engineering and Technology, Quality Engineering.

3. M.Tech / ME / M.Sc Engg. / M.Arch. Master of Technology / Master of Engineering / Master of Science (Engineering) / Master of Architecture
(by full time / part time / DLP).
Areas of Specialisation :
Engineering and Technology
Architecture,
Civil Engineering / Construction Engineering
Electrical and / Electronics / Telecommunication Engg.
Environmental Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Computer / Information Sciences and Engineering
Bio-Technology
Bio-Informatics
Bio-Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Aeronautical Engineering
Dairy Technology
Genetics
Leather Technology
Printing Technology
Marine Engineering
Paper and Pulp Technology
Rubber Technology
Textile Technology
Polymer Engineering
Plastic Engineering
Petroleum Engineering
Oil Technology
Software Engineering
Fuel Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Mining Engineering
Nuclear Engineering / Technology
Sugar Engineering and Technology
Quality Engineering.

4. B.Tech / BE / B.Sc Engg. Bachelor of Technology, Bachelor of Engineering, Bachelor of Science Engineering (by distance learning / full time / part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Aeronautical Engineering
Agricultural Engineering
Architecture Engineering
Automobile Engineering
Bio-Medical Engineering
Bio-Technology
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Dairy Technology
Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering
Energy Engineering
Environmental Engineering
Fire Engineering
Geo-Informatics
Marine Engineering
Pulp and Paper Technology
Information Technology
Mining Engineering
Petroleum Engineering
Production / Industrial Engineering
Sugar Technology
Textile Technology

5. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Environment Friendly Architecture
Landscaping
Regional Planning
Transportation Engineering
Automobile Engineering
Earthquake Engineering
Drilling Engineering
Fermentation Technology
Food Science and Technology
Remote Sensing
Geo-Informatics
Hill Area Development
Maintenance Engineering
Embedded Technology

6. Certificate Certificate Courses (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Geographical Information System
Hydrology
Internet and Website Management
Jewellery Design and Manufacturing


7. Faculty of Oriental Medicine
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Naturopathy, Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha,
External / Integrated) Indian Systems of Medicine, Homeopathy, Alternative Complementary, Polypathic, Integrated and Energetic Medicine.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Naturopathy, Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha,
Indian Systems of Medicine, Homeopathy, Alternative Complementary, Polypathic, Integrated and Energetic Medicine.

3. M.Sc Master of Science (by full time / part time / DLP).
Areas of Specialisation :
Naturopathy, Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha, Indian Systems of Medicine, Homeopathy, Alternative Complementary, Polypathic, Integrated and Energetic Medicine.

4. MD Doctor of Medicine
Ayurveda
Homeopathy
Naturopathy

5. B.Sc. Bachelor of Science (by distance learning / full time /
part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Naturopathy
Yogic Sciences
Ayurveda
Unani

6. BAMS Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery

7. BHMS Bachelor of Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery

8. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Allopathy (Perhaps Allopathy), Absent Healing, Acupressure, Acupuncture, Agnihotra, Akabane, Alexander Technique (Better Posture), Aerial Therapy, Anthrosophical Medicine, Aromatherapy, Art Therapy, Astropathy, Aura Therapy, Auricular Therapy, Autogenic Training, Autosuggestion, Aversion Therapy, Ayurveda, Bach Remedies, Bates Method (Improving Eyesight), Behavioural Therapy, Biochemic, Bioenergetics Therapy, Biofeedback, Biorhythms, Bio-Transmission, Brahmini Chikitsa, Chandsi Chikitsa, Charismatic Healing (Prayer), Chiropractic (Pain Relieving), Cognitive Therapy, Colour Therapy, Cell Therapy, Copper Therapy, Co-Counselling, Cranial Osteopathy, Cupping, Cymatics, Cromopathy, Colonic Irrigation, Conybio FIR (Ear Infra Red), Dance Movement Therapy, Diet Therapy, Doctrine of Signatures, Douching, Dowsing, Electro Therapy, Electro-Convulsive Therapy, Eurhythmy, Erotic Healing, Electro Homeopathy, Ecological Medicine, Energetic Medicine, Faith Healing, Fasting, Feldenkrais Method, Feng-Shui, Floatation Therapy, Fluoridation, Folk Medicine, Fruits and Vegetable Therapy, Fired Therapy, Galacto Therapy, Gem Essence Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Hair Transmission Therapy, Hellerwork, Herbal Medicine, Homeopathy, Humanistic Psychology, Hydro Therapy, Hypno Therapy, Harpatopathy, Helio Therapy, Holistic Medicine, Hilarious Laughter Therapy, Immunopathy, Inhalation Therapy, Iridology, Inner and Self Healing, Ionisation Therapy, Jogging, J J Dechane's Harbo Mineral Therapy, Kinesiology, Kirlian Photography, Keni's Charismatic Karishma, Laughing, Liquorice, Light Therapy, Manipulative Therapy, Meditation, Megavitamin Therapy, Magneto Therapy, Mesmerism, Metamorphic Technique, Melos's Medicare, Miasm Theory, Moxibustion, Mud Therapy, Music Therapy, Massage Therapy, Naturopathy, Nyasa Healing, Orgone Therapy, Orthomolecular Medicine, Osteopathy l Skull Osteopathy, Polarity Therapy, Primal Therapy, Psionic Medicine, Poison Therapy, Positive Thinking Therapy, Psycho Therapy, Pyramid Power, Radio Therapy, Rakchhashi Chikitsa (Therapy), Reflexology, Reichian Therapy, Reiki, Rogerian Therapy, Rolfing, Sauna Bath, Sex Therapy, Shiatsu, Shruti Chikitsa, Silva Method, Somatography, Sound Therapy, Spas, Spiritual Healing, Stool Therapy, Sleep Therapy, Surgery, Sun Therapy, Tai-Chi-Chuan (Meditation in Motion), Theatre Therapy, Transmission Therapy, Turkish Bath, Thalassotherapy, Tanra Mantra Yantra Therapy, Tibetan Medicine, Transactional Therapy Touch Therapy, Urine Therapy, Unani or Tibbi Hikmat, Ultrasound Therapy, Visualisation Therapy, Voice Therapy, Vibration Therapy, Yoga, Zen/Zen Garden (Buddhist Path to Self-discovery), Zone Therapy

9. Certificate Certificate Courses (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Reiki, Rogerian Therapy, Rolfing, Sauna Bath, Sex Therapy, Shiatsu, Shruti Chikitsa, Silva Method, Somatography, Sound Therapy, Spas, Spiritual Healing, Stool Therapy, Sleep Therapy, Surgery, Sun Therapy, Tai-Chi-Chuan (Meditation in Motion), Theatre Therapy, Transmission Therapy, Turkish Bath, Thalassotherapy, Tanra Mantra Yantra Therapy, Tibetan Medicine, Transactional Therapy Touch Therapy, Urine Therapy, Unani or Tibbi Hikmat, Ultrasound Therapy, Visualisation Therapy, Voice Therapy, Zone Therapy

8. Faculty of Modern Medicine
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Medicine, Surgery, Dental Science, Hospital
External / Integrated) Administration.

2. MD / MS / M.Sc. Doctor of Medicine / Master of Surgery / Master of Science
Emphasis : Anaesthesiology, Anatomy, Ayurved/Siddha, Bacteriology, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Blood Transfusion, Cardiology, Child Health Opthalmology, Community Health Admn., Community Medicine, Dermatology, Dermatology (including Leprosy & Venereal Diseases), Dermatology & Venereology, ENT, Family Medicine, Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, General Medicine, General Med. & Therapeutics, Goriatric Medicine, General Surgery, Homoeopathy, Hospital Admn., Human Physiology, Leprosy, Medical General Surgery, Mecine & Therapeutics, Microbiology, Microbiology (Physical), Midwifery, Midwifery & Gynae, Neurology, Nuclear Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynaecology and Diseases of New Born, Obstertrics and Gynaecology, Occupational Health, Otorhinotaryngology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedics, Paediatrics, Pathology, Pathology & Bacteriology, Pharmacology, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Physiology, Preventive and Social Medicine, Psychiatry, Psychological Medicine, Radio Diagnosis, Radiology, Radiopathy, Radio Therapy, Siddha, Skin and VD, Skin Diseases, Surgery , Transfusion Medicine, Tropical Medicine, Tuberculosis Tuberculosis & Chest Diseases, Tuberculosis & Respiratory Diseases, Unani, Venereology, Venereology & Leprosy, MD (Ay), MDs, MHA/MHM, MOth., MPharm, MPharm (Ay), Master of Public Health (MPH), Master of Physiotherapy (MPT)

3. Graduate MBBS
BDS
B.Pharm


9. Faculty of Paramedical Studies
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy,
External / Integrated) Radiology and Imaging Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Ophthalmology, Hospital Administration.

2. MD / M.Sc. Doctor of Medicine / Master of Science
Emphasis : Anatomy, Applied Nutrition, Audiology & Speech Therapy, Bacterial, Biochem, Bio-Physics, Biostat, Biochem Clinical, Biotech, Communication, Dental Materials, Drug Assay, Embryology & Histology, Epidemiology, Genetics, Helminthology, Hospital Admn., Human Anatomy, Human Physiol, Medical Biotech, Medical Entomology, Medical Software, Medical Tech, Medical Biochem, Medicinal Plants, Medicine, Medical Lab Tech, Microbiol, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physical Therapy, Physiology, Psychiatric Nursing, Radiational Phy, Speech & Hearing, Sports Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Radiology.

3. Graduate
BMLT
BMR
BMRT
BMRSc
BNMT
BNYS
BOptometry (Clinical)
BOrth
BPharm
BSc/PT,OT/BPT/Physio/BOT
BSc (Audiology & Speech Therapy)
Rehabilitation
BRTT
BSLH
BSc Anaesthesia, Applied Audiology & Speech Rehabilitation, Ophthalmic Techniques, Physical Therapies, Allied Health Sciences, Anatomy, Biochem, Hearing & Speech, Hospital Admn, Human Biology, Medical Microbiol, Med. Tech. In Radiography, Paramedical, Medical Lab Tech, Medical Tech., Medical Tech. Radiotherapy, Medical Radiology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy /Physiotherapy, Operational Theatre Tech, Physician Asstt, Prosthetics & Orthotics.



10. Faculty of Law
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / LL.D Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Laws
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Constitution and Administration Law, Labour
External / Integrated) Laws, Public Law and Governance, Human Rights Laws, Income Tax Laws, IPR Laws, Corporate Laws, Environmental Law, International Law.


2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Constitutional and Administrative Law, Labour
Laws, Public Law and Governance, Human Rights Laws, Income Tax Laws, IPR Laws, Corporate Laws, Environmental Law, International Law.
Masters Degree
3. LLM Master of Laws
(by full time / part time / DLP).

4. MBA, LLM Master of Business Administration, Integrated with Master of Laws (by distance learning / full time / part time).
Bachelor's Degree
5. LL.B Bachelor of Laws

6. BA, LL.B Bachelor of Arts integrated with Bachelor of Laws

7. B.Sc., LL.B Bachelor of Science integrated with Bachelor of Laws

8. BBA, LL.B Bachelor of Business Administration integrated with Bachelor of Laws.

9. PG Diploma / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Diploma (full time / part time / distance)
Areas of Specialisation :
Administrative Law, Environmental Law, Corporate Law, Constitutional Law, Tax Laws, Human Rights Law, Intellectual Property Law, Constitutional Law, Industrial Law, Business Laws, Labour Laws.

11. Faculty of Education
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Educational Planning and Administration,
External / Integrated) Physical Education, Educational Technology, Guidance and Counselling, Special Education, Sports Education, Vocational Education, Elementary Education, Pre-Nursery and Kindergarten Education, Child Education, Secondary Education, Technical Education, Yogic Education.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Educational Planning and Administration,
Physical Education, Educational Technology, Guidance and Counselling, Special Education, Sports Education, Vocational Education, Elementary Education, Pre-Nursery and Kindergarten Education, Child Education, Secondary Education, Technical Education, Yogic Education.

3. M.Ed Master of Education
(by full time / part time / DLP).

4. MA (Edu.Planning & Admn.) Master of Arts (Educational Planning & Administration)
(by full time / part time / DLP).

5. MPEd Master of Physical Education
(by full time / part time / DLP).

6. MSportsEd. Master of Sports Education

7. MSM Master of Sports Management

8. B.Ed Bachelor of Education
(by full time / part time / DLP).

9. BA, B.Ed Bachelor of Arts integrated with Bachelor of Education
(by full time / part time / DLP).

10. B.Sc., B.Ed Bachelor of Science integrated with Bachelor of Edn.

11. BBA, B.Ed Bachelor of Business Administration integrated with Bachelor of Education.

12. BPEd Bachelor of Physical Education

13. BA, BPEd Bachelor of Arts integrated with Bachelor of Physical Edn.

14. B.Sc., BPEd Bachelor of Science integrated with Bachelor of Phy. Edn.

15. BBA, BPEd Bachelor of Business Administration integrated with Bachelor of Physical Education.

16. B.SportsEd. Bachelor of Sports Education.


12. Faculty of Media Studies
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Journalism and Mass Communication, News
External / Integrated) Reading and Broadcasting, Reporting, Public Relations, Corporate Communications, Cyber Journalism, Rural Communication, Technical Writing, Web Journalism, Photo Journalism.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Journalism and Mass Communication, News
Reading and Broadcasting, Reporting, Public Relations, Corporate Communications, Cyber Journalism, Rural Communication, Technical Writing, Web Journalism, Photo Journalism.

3. MA / M.Sc / MJMC / MMedS/ MPR Master of Arts / Master of Science / Master of Journalism and Mass Communication / Master of Media Studies / Master of Public Relations (by full time / part time / DLP).
Areas of Specialisation :
Media Studies, Journalism and Mass Communication, Advertising and Public Relations, News Agency Journalism, Broadcast Journalism, Print Media Communication, Electronic Media, Web Media, Cyber Media, Photo Journalism, Acting, Directing, Anchoring, Editing, Production for Electronic Media, TV and Channel Production, Sports Journalism.

4. BJMC / BA / B.Sc. / BPR / BMedS Bachelor of Journalism and Mass Communication / Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Public Relations / Bachelor of Media Studies
(by distance learning / full time / part time).
Areas of Specialisation :
Media Studies, Journalism and Mass Communication, Advertising and Public Relations, News Agency Journalism, Broadcast Journalism, Print Media Communication, Electronic Media, Web Media, Cyber Media, Photo Journalism, Acting, Directing, Anchoring, Editing, Production for Electronic Media, TV and Channel Production, Sports Journalism.


13. Faculty of Dance, Drama and Music
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt.
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Bharatnatyam, Kathak, Dramatics, Folk
External / Integrated) Music, Indian Classical Dance, Indian Music, Ballet, Kuchipudi Dance, Karnatak Music, Kathakali, Manipuri Dance, Music Appreciation, Mohiniyattam, Odissi Dance, Tabla, Vocal Music, Folklore, Instrumental Music, Performing Arts, Indian Theatre.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Bharatnatyam, Kathak, Dramatics, Folk
Music, Indian Classical Dance, Indian Music, Ballet, Kuchipudi Dance, Karnatak Music, Kathakali, Manipuri Dance, Music Appreciation, Mohiniyattam, Odissi Dance, Tabla, Vocal Music, Folklore, Instrumental Music, Performing Arts, Indian Theatre, Ravindra Sangit, Sitar, Stringed Instrument, Flute, Computer Music.
Master's Degree
3. MMus Master of Music

4. MDance / MA (Dance) Master of Dance / Master of Arts (Dance)

5. Master of Drama / MA (Drama) Master of Drama / Master of Arts (Drama)

6. MPA Master of Performing Arts

Bachelor's Degree
7. BMus. Bachelor of Music

8. BPA Bachelor of Performing Arts

9. BDance Bachelor of Dance

10. BDrama Bachelor of Drama

11. BA (Music / Dance / Drama) Bachelor of Arts (Music / Dance / Drama)


14. Faculty of Fine Arts
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Fine Arts, Painting, Sculpture, Visual Art,
External / Integrated) Critical Curation, Critical History in Art, Drawing and Painting, Graphic Arts, Interior Design, Plastic Arts, Textile Design, Exhibition Design, Event Management, Pottery.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Fine Arts, Painting, Sculpture, Visual Art,
Critical Curation, Critical History in Art, Drawing and Painting, Graphic Arts, Interior Design, Plastic Arts, Textile Design, Exhibition Design, Event Management, Pottery.

Master's Degree
3. MFA Master of Fine Arts

4. MA (Fine Arts) Master of Arts (Fine Arts)



15. Faculty of Fashion Technology and Cosmetology
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Fashion Technology, Fashion Science,
External / Integrated) Beauty Science, Cosmetology, Cosmetics, Depolluting Technologies for Pollution Control in Textile Manufacturing, Costume Designing, Jewellery Designing, Accessory Designing, Footwear Designing, Body Building, Beauty Care and Health Services, Gym Management, Fashion Development.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Fashion Technology, Fashion Science,
Beauty Science, Cosmetology, Cosmetics, Depolluting Technologies for Pollution Control in Textile Manufacturing, Costume Designing, Jewellery Designing, Accessory Designing, Footwear Designing, Body Building, Beauty Care and Health Services, Gym Management, Fashion Development, Computer Added Textile Design, Cosmetics and Perfumery Technology.

Master's Degrees
3. MFT Master of Fashion Technology.

4. MA / M.Sc. (FT) Master of Arts / Master of Science (Fashion Tech).

5. MA / M.Sc. (Cosmetology) Master of Arts / Master of Science (Cosmetology).

Bachelor's Degrees
3. BFT Bachelor of Fashion Technology.

4. BA / B.Sc. (FT) Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor of Science (Fashion Tech).

5. BA / B.Sc. (Cosmetology) Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor of Science (Cosmetology).


16. Faculty of Agriculture
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees
1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Agricultural Business Management,
External / Integrated) Agricultural, Engineering, Agricultural Bio-Technology, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Extension, Agricultural Micro-Biology, Agricultural Meteorology, Agricultural Statistics, Agricultural Marketing, Agronomy, Animal Science, Animal Husbandry, Cooperative and Banking, Dairy Technology, Horticulture, Food Science, Sericulture, Entomology, Pomology, Fisheries Science, Genetic and Plant Breeding, Medicinal Plants.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Agricultural Business Management,
Agricultural, Engineering, Agricultural Bio-Technology, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Extension, Agricultural Micro-Biology, Agricultural Meteorology, Agricultural Statistics, Agricultural Marketing, Agronomy, Animal Science, Animal Husbandry, Cooperative and Banking, Dairy Technology, Horticulture, Food Science, Sericulture, Entomology, Pomology, Fisheries Science, Genetic and Plant Breeding, Medicinal Plants.
Master's Degrees
3. ME / M.Tech (Agri.Engg.) Master of Engineering / Master of Technology (Agricultural Engineering).

4. MVSc & AH Master of Veterinary Science & Animal Husbandry

5. MFSc Master of Fisheries Science

6. M.Sc Master of Science with specialisation in Agricultural Business Management, Agricultural, Engineering, Agricultural Bio-Technology, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Extension, Agricultural Micro-Biology, Agricultural Meteorology, Agricultural Statistics, Agricultural Marketing, Agronomy, Animal Science, Animal Husbandry, Cooperative and Banking, Dairy Technology, Horticulture, Food Science, Sericulture, Entomology, Pomology, Fisheries Science, Genetic and Plant Breeding, Medicinal Plants, Wood Science, Forestry.
Bachelor's Degrees
7. B.Tech (Agri.Engg.) Bachelor of Technology (Agricultural Engineering).

8. B.Sc. (AG) Bachelor of Science (Agriculture)

9. BVSc & AH Bachelor of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry

10. B.Tech (Dairy Tech) Bachelor of Technology (Dairy Technology)

11. B.Sc. Bachelor of Science with specialisation in Agricultural Business Management, Agricultural, Engineering, Agricultural Bio-Technology, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Extension, Agricultural Micro-Biology, Agricultural Meteorology, Agricultural Statistics, Agricultural Marketing, Agronomy, Animal Science, Animal Husbandry, Cooperative and Banking, Dairy Technology, Horticulture, Food Science, Sericulture, Entomology, Pomology, Fisheries Science, Genetic and Plant Breeding, Wood Science, Forestry.


17. Faculty of Science
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Actuarial Science, Agro-Chemicals and
External / Integrated) Fertilisers, Applied Nutrition, Astrology, Bio-Statistics, Bio-Technology, Botany, Child Care, Bio-Chemistry, Criminology, Defence Studies, Ecology and Environment, Energy, Floriculture, Food Science, Genetics, Geography, Geology, Geophysics, Home Science, Military Science, Paste Control, Petro Chemicals, Sanitary Science, Hygiene, Climatology, Bio-Informatics, Geo-Informatics, Oceanography, Museum Studies, Seeds Science and Technology, Sports Medicine, Sports Science, Tribal Development, Population Studies.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Actuarial Science, Agro-Chemicals and
Fertilisers, Applied Nutrition, Astrology, Bio-Statistics, Bio-Technology, Botany, Child Care, Bio-Chemistry, Criminology, Defence Studies, Ecology and Environment, Energy, Floriculture, Food Science, Genetics, Geography, Geology, Geophysics, Home Science, Military Science, Paste Control, Petro Chemicals, Sanitary Science, Hygiene, Climatology, Bio-Informatics, Geo-Informatics, Oceanography, Museum Studies, Seeds Science and Technology, Sports Medicine, Sports Science, Tribal Development, Population Studies.

Master's Degrees
3. M.Sc. Master of Science with specialisation in Actuarial Science, Agro-Chemicals and Fertilisers, Applied Nutrition, Astrology, Bio-Statistics, Bio-Technology, Botany, Child Care, Bio-Chemistry, Criminology, Defence Studies, Ecology and Environment, Energy, Floriculture, Food Science, Genetics, Geography, Geology, Geophysics, Home Science, Military Science, Paste Control, Petro Chemicals, Sanitary Science, Hygiene, Climatology, Bio-Informatics, Geo-Informatics, Oceanography, Museum Studies, Seeds Science and Technology, Sports Medicine, Sports Science, Tribal Development, Population Studies, Yogic Science, Wildlife, Toxicology.

Bachelor's Degrees
4. B.Sc. Bachelor of Science with specialisation in Actuarial Science, Agro-Chemicals and Fertilisers, Applied Nutrition, Astrology, Bio-Statistics, Bio-Technology, Botany, Child Care, Bio-Chemistry, Criminology, Defence Studies, Ecology and Environment, Energy, Floriculture, Food Science, Genetics, Geography, Geology, Geophysics, Home Science, Military Science, Paste Control, Petro Chemicals, Sanitary Science, Hygiene, Climatology, Bio-Informatics, Geo-Informatics, Oceanography, Museum Studies, Seeds Science and Technology, Sports Medicine, Sports Science, Tribal Development, Population Studies, Yogic Science, Wildlife, Toxicology.


18. Faculty of Emerging Science and Technology
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Physiognomy, Strategic Studies, Forensic
External / Integrated) Science, Geographical Information System, Defence Studies, Genetics, Astrology, Futurology, Interior Decoration, Waste Management and Recycling, Tribal Development, Astronomy, Ecological Philosophy, Intellectual Property Rights, Polypathy, Printing and Publishing Science, Yoga and Naturopathy, Depolluting Technologies, Disaster Education, Sustainability, Total Quality Management, Aesthetics.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Physiognomy, Strategic Studies, Forensic
Science, Geographical Information System, Defence Studies, Genetics, Astrology, Futurology, Interior Decoration, Waste Management and Recycling, Tribal Development, Astronomy, Ecological Philosophy, Intellectual Property Rights, Polypathy, Printing and Publishing Science, Yoga and Naturopathy, Depolluting Technologies, Disaster Education, Sustainability, Total Quality Management, Aesthetics, Andragogy, Police Administration, Manuscriptology, Armament Technology, Bio-Fertilisers, Bio-Gas Development, Voluntary Action, Furniture Technology, Gem Testing and Art Lapidary, Larynology and Otology, Lexicography, Econography, Nano Technology.
Master's Degrees
3. M.Sc. / M.Tech Master of Science / Master of Technology in the above mentioned subjects and areas.

Bechelor's Degrees
4. B.Sc. Bachelor of Science in the above mentioned subjects and areas.


19. Faculty of Language Studies
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Linguistics, English, Spanish, French,
External / Integrated) Russian, German, Japanese, Arabic, Korean, Burmese, Cantonese, Portuguese, Dutch, Swiss, Swedish, Danish, Greek, Latin, Armenian, Italian, Persian, Syriac, Turkish, Bhasha Indonesia, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Polish, Hebrew, Mongolian, Tibetan, Hindi, Regional Languages of Africa.

2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Linguistics, English, Spanish, French, Russian, German, Japanese, Arabic, Korean, Burmese, Cantonese, Portuguese, Dutch, Swiss, Swedish, Danish, Greek, Latin, Armenian, Italian, Persian, Syriac, Turkish, Bhasha Indonesia, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Polish, Hebrew, Mongolian, Tibetan, Hindi, Regional Languages of Africa.

Master's Degree
3. MA Master of Arts with specialisation in the subjects mentioned above.

Bachelor's Degree
4. BA Bachelor of Arts with specialisation in the subjects mentioned above.

5. PG Dip. / Diploma Post Graduate Diploma / Diploma in the subjects mentioned above.


20. Faculty of Library and Information Sciences
The following Post Doctoral, Doctoral, Master's, Bachelor's Degrees, Post Graduate Diplomas / Graduate Diplomas / Under Graduate Diplomas and Certificates will be conducted :

Sl.No. Abbreviation of the Degrees Explanation of the Degrees

1. Ph.D / D.Litt. / D.Sc. Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Litt. / Doctor of Science
(Full Time / Part Time / Emphasis : Library Science, Documentation, Information
External / Integrated) Science, Cataloguing, Library Management, Books and Periodicals Procurement, Book Reviews, Printing and Publications Research.


2. M.Phil Master of Philosophy (by research / distance learning /
part time / full time / summer sequential programme).
Emphasis : Library Science, Documentation, Information
Science, Cataloguing, Library Management, Books and Periodicals Procurement, Book Reviews, Printing and Publications Research.

Master's Degree
3. MLSc / MLISc Master of Library Science / Master of Library and Information Science

Bachelor's Degree
4. BLSc / BLISc Bachelor of Library Science / Bachelor of Library and Information Science


Memorandum of Understanding

This Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein and The Eurasian University for mutual and technical cooperation with a view to establishing The Eurasian University campus in the Principality of Liechtenstein witnesseth in the following lines :


Preamble

1. The Eurasian University has been incorporated in the Principality of Liechtenstein as an International Charity and has expert knowledge of Institution Building. It has been offered to the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein regarding the expertise for getting The Eurasian University recognised and accredited established in the Principality of Liechtenstein for promoting higher and tertiary education and for introducing job oriented vocational courses through formal as well as non formal educational modes.

2. The Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein have responded favourably to introduce this unique idea based on the detailed report submitted by the Founder of The Eurasian University.

Accordingly the role of the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein and The Eurasian University are being mentioned below :

Role of Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein :

a. Getting the Charter of The Eurasian University approved by the Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein.

b. Assisting in the creation and establishment of The Eurasian University in the Principality of Liechtenstein.

Role of The Eurasian University :

a. Leading the University by designing and implementing different projects by appointing faculty and other staff from the Principality of Liechtenstein and from other countries.

b. To take care of different funding requirements from time to time.

c. To offer full time, part time, on-line and distance learning academic programmes.

d. To transfer the appropriate technology of export of know how and educational consultancy.

It is mutually agreed that The Eurasian University will be established within six months from the date of the signing of this Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

In testimony where of the representatives of Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein and The Eurasian University are putting their respective signatures.



Founder Competent Authority
The Eurasian University Principality of Liechtenstein


Draft


Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein
Vaduz, Liechtenstein

 

Notification


The Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein hereby approves the creation and establishment of The Eurasian University in Liechtenstein, approves the Charter annexed herewith and recognises the Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral Degrees awarded by the University under full time, part time, on-line, distance and virtual education modes.


 

Competent Authority


The EURASIAN UNIVERSITY
Liechtenstein
 


CHARTER
Declaration of Name
The name of the organisation shall be The Eurasian University, Liechtenstein (hereinafter referred to as the University). It shall be a self-governing international body having non-political, non-governmental and non-profit making educational character.

Aims and Objects
1. To undertake an international scientific research programme to develop an understanding of the earth and its environs as a single physical, biological and geological system and build a predictive capability based on that understanding.
2. To collect data related to the existing educational and training facilities in different countries of the world in general and the developing countries in particular for further transferring the technology of institution building either on a turn key basis or otherwise.
3. To help the countries in diagnosing its own societal needs and requirements in order to define the basic level of learning to meet the needs of its population.
4. To help analyse the national background characteristics, financial constraints, current educational efforts and effects and present conditions of societal development in a country.
5. To help countries establish appropriate targets and derive suitable strategies for implementing policies and programmes to meet the educational and institution building needs.
6. To help the countries in having a new vision for institution building by making the concerned decision makers aware with the necessary policies and issues like relevance, quality, equity and efficiency.
7. To especially assist the third world countries in the establishment of universities and educational institutions for studies, training and research in the areas of emerging fields like ecology, environment, bio technology, computer sciences and engineering, business administration, rural development, adult and continuing education, jouranalism and mass communication, advertising and public relations, hotel, restaurant and hospitality management, peace science, alternative and complementary medicine, inner and self healing, eco-philosophy, buddhist philosophy, cooperative management, law and justice, agriculture, medicine, engineering, science and technology and related educational fields.
8. To conduct feasibility studies, monitoring programmes on behalf of the international funding and developmental bodies for funding the different educational projects in the developing countries and for assessing the impact of such investments.
9. To provide educational and consultancy support for women’s educational attainment to reduce the rate of maternal and infant mortality and improve the nutritional aspects.
10. To serve as a forum of exchange of ideas and experience and collections and dissemination of information on institution building practices and techniques.
11. To educate all those engaged in institution building activities for optimising the available resources of funds, manpower, infrastructure and instructional materials.
12. To help promote such new Federal and State legislation or amendments all over the world as may be deemed necessary for the educational development through formal, nonformal, continuing and distance learning systems.
13. To invite the different educational organisations including the universities, institutes, colleges, research bodies to collaborate with the University for establishing joint ventures for the benefit of the world society and its optimum development.
14. To visit different parts of the globe to propagate the philosophy of institution building in order to bring efficiency and productivity in the institutions.
15. To establish a Life and Career Advising Centre - a single point of contact for student counselling on academic, personal and career issues.
16. To create a learning environment all over the world that encourages students to become actively involved in their own education.
17. To help reduce unemployment in the developing countries by assisting the Governments and public institutions in the initiation of professional and job oriented courses and by introducing the urban as well as rural entrepreneurship programmes for self employment.
18. To organise the undergraduate, graduate, postgraduate, doctoral and post doctoral programmes for the benefit of the students all over the world.
19. To institute a Chair in Institution Building and Global Education in the universities, colleges and other bodies to make appointment to teachership including professorship and fellowship.
20. To encourage education that is free of prejudice and party politics which promotes new ideas relating to sustainability.
21. To stimulate tolerance in human beings so that they may contribute towards the welfare of mankind regardless of sex, nationality, race, creed, religion and culture.
22. To seek to be recognized by its activities, as being international by transcending geographical boundaries in every aspect of its work.
23. To strive to acquire international prestige for the University and to help develop faith and confidence in it on the part of all who are concerned with the destiny of mankind.
24. To preserve the functions of Gaia to maintain constancy and adjustment to changes for having a sustainable world.
25. To strengthen the voluntary as well as non governmental organisations in order to make them available for the organisation and implementation of programmes having a positive, social, economic and educational content.
26. To serve as a forum for exchange of ideas and experience and collection and dissemination of information on global open education and its monitoring, impact, information awareness, policy, law, research promotion, training and development in particular.
27. To mobilise the efforts through open education to keep cities, towns and rural areas clean, beautiful and pollution free to improve the quality of life.
28. To spur the development, in the public and private sectors, of the effective use of technologies that enable local, regional and national governments to make use of international data bases.
29. To support governmental and private efforts that will help business managers understand more fully the environmental and social impacts of their actions and the relationships of these impacts to long term economic survival and public acceptance of their organisations.
30. To help the governments in organising formal and non formal training programmes in attitudinal and behavioural change for bringing productivity and efficiency in the existing systems.
31. To direct an increased share of voluntary contributions to global education programmes and the institutions support voluntary programmes under which pollution control specialists and other experts are made available to developing countries and participate in conferences and organisations seeking sustained dialogue among business, government and citizen.
32. To organise a series of international events designed to attract wide attention from the media, policy makers, business leaders and others to a series of key issues : the loss of biological diversity, changes in climate and precipitation patterns, degradation of agricultural land, emergence of resistance to pesticides and others.
33. To publicise through the media an international network instances of successful policies, programmes and demonstrations and bring these success stories to the attention of policy makers.
34. To emphasize experiments and demonstrations of innovative technologies and approaches to sustainable development including social mechanisms for the management of common resources.
35. To strengthen NGOs in developing countries by encouraging financial support from abroad, building links and collaborative projects among open learning agencies in industrial and developing countries.
36. To establish an international network of like minded NGOs with the ability to publicise activities that threaten world life support system and to mobilise expressions of international public concern.
37. To institute an international programme of awards for developing countries’ NGOs active in promoting sustainability, thereby conveying prestige, ligitimacy and support.
38. To assist regional NGOs’ networks around the world since these important linkage mechanisms even in the richer regions are severely underfunded.
39. To strengthen international scientific organisations so that they can play a larger part in shaping and coordinating the research agenda on global resource problems and in obtaining consensus on priorities for both research and action.
40. To transfer the technology, knowhow, hardware and software for establishing institutions relating to ecology, environment, inner and self healing, alternative and complementary medicine, eco-philosophy, for having a sustainable society by optimising the budgets of the governments.
41. To publish literature on developmental issues in different languages of the world bringing a mass movement for protecting the Mother Earth.
42. To popularise the use of recycled paper for protecting the forest from further damage and to help encourage entrepreneurs to start small and cottage industries for manufacturing recycled paper.
43. To involve children by catching them young for making them aware of the need for protecting our Mother Earth.
44. To consider means such as international joint ventures to stimulate the development and application of remote sensing technologies.
45. To focus more and larger efforts on the environmental and resource problems of the developing countries by funding sources and educating the scientists on the importance of research into technologies relevant to the developing world and the poor, expanding scientific exchanges between industrial and developing countries, creating stronger links between research institutions in the two groups, and expanding the number of top scientific institutions in the developing countries.
46. To work closely with policy research centres focussing on global scale resource and development issues to bridge the gap between basic research and policy.
47. To diagnose weaknesses in the national as well as 88international environmental laws so as to stop the polluters from further damaging the global environment.
48. To evaluate the existing curricula of the undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate level courses and propose necessary changes for making these programmes fit for helping the alumnis to find self employment opportunities by acquiring entrepreneurial leadership techniques alongwith the appropriate technologies for depolluting the human mind and our Mother Earth.
49. To launch an international effort to raise the level of awareness of the nature and importance of biological diversity including the sponsorship by scientific and environmental organisations from and around the world of a major international event designed to bring to the attention of policy makers in all countries both the links between biological diversity and other prominent concerns and the depth of public support for preservation efforts.
50. To develop national conservation strategies within the world conservation strategy framework for conserving biological diversity while achieving sustainable development.
51. To address the universal shortage of trained personnel in alternative medicine, ethnobotany, resource management, forestry, genetics, taxonomy and ecology through a sharp increase in funds from national governments and international agencies going to universities and mid level training programmes.
52. To help enforce vigorously national laws and international treaties and conventions protecting wildlife and endangered species.
53. To encourage private sector participation in tree farming through fiscal measures including longterm leases of government forests and to cooperatives, village associations and private companies.
54. To use restructured educational and training programmes to reorient rural development from a policing mission to providing technical extension support to small farmers, village cooperatives, private companies and others to use the services.
55. To help initiate training cum production cum rehabilitation centres in the rural areas for the benefit of all those living there.
56. To create employment generation environment by updating the existing vocational training programmes in the polytechnics, institutions, colleges and universities.
57. To strengthen with adequate study materials the existing distance learning programmes for allowing the earning while learning.
58. To prepare instructional texts including audio and video lessons to be distributed through the existing institutions as well as through the new outfits of the university.
59. To use the existing and new satellite channels for teaching and training through the air for the benefit of the global society.
60. To translate the textbooks and monographs of the University as well as of other institutions in different languages for reaching upto the grassroot level in all the countries.
61. To make special plans for the studies and research in the areas of eco system, ethnobiology, wildlife preservation and cultural heritage by collaborating with national and international bodies.
62. To aid in organising conferences, seminars, meetings, discussions, debates, study courses, collection of statistics, exhibitions, shows, tour tips and to establish endowments and scholarships for the promotion and furtherance of the aims and objects of the University.
63. To organise environmental museums and ethnobotanical herbarium for popularising the use of herbal medicines.
64. To conduct sponsored as well as non sponsored research programmes with the support of Federal and State Governments and publish such reports and case books.
65. To prepare special reports on different countries with a view to help their planning process.
66. To organise philosophical, peace prayers and meetings for depolluting human mind.
67. To establish a research station for testing the air, water, noise, soil, thermal, nuclear, food and mental pollution.
68. To publish books, encyclopaedias, and directories on different developmental subjects.
69. To visit the specific areas all over the world for making plans and projects related to global open education.
70. To help the activists in creating and establishing voluntary and non-governmental bodies for the promotion of open, non formal and distance education.
71. To direct the operation of new plants designed for resource recovery, biomass conversion, wind energy, geothermal power and small scale hydroelectric power.
72. To help limit human impact on the biosphere to a level that is within its carrying capacity.
73. To help maintain the stock of biological wealth.
74. To use non renewable resources at rates that do not exceed the creation of renewable substitutes.
75. To arouse in teachers and other educators a full awareness of our responsibilities in moulding future generations for a peaceful world.
76. To promote that kind of education that will help each individual from earliest years to develop full human potential for constructive, peaceful living in the expanding communities in which one grows ; family, neighbourhood, school, local community, country, in fact, that whole human world.
77. To seek to enable individuals through constant educational improvement to deal with and resolve misunderstanding, personal as well as social, in this spirit of wisdom, charity and duty.
78. To support production and wide spread distribution of educational materials for the furtherance of social progress, international understanding, and worldly stability.
79. To make the full use of mass media for the cause of peace, education, inner and self healing especially in the proper communication of controversial views and issues, local and global, so as to maximize cooperation and conciliation.
80. To encourage the development and use of peace science, engineering and research throughout the world’s educational systems.
81. To organise countrywise campaign for tackling the problems of peace by giving capsule courses and training programmes.
82. To make everybody aware regarding the need for national as well as international integration and cooperation.
83. To invite representatives of different countries including the universities, NGOs and regulatory bodies for discussing international issues like global climate change, sea level rise, nuclear disarmament and ozone depletion.
84. To seek support of the educational and scientific organisations for using their facilities and infrastructure for conducting the different programmes of the university.
85. To design courses on subjects and topics generally not covered by other institutions but are of great importance viewing the changes in the societal systems.
86. To continue to be open in ideas, methods, systems, places with no cloisters.
87. To help people through appropriate training to lead a way of life that can be sustained by our Mother Earth.
88. To justify the creation of The Eurasian University, Liechtenstein for environmental sustainability in order to influence the power structure of the world through their function as international counselling centres, and by placing them, whenever possible, in areas of conflict for equalizing the flow of knowledge, for reducing aggression and for generating attitudes of fraternization.
89. To suggest national and international leaders alternative approaches to the solution of problems relating to health, education, unemployment, pollution and peace.
90. To encourage the establishment of institutions for learning that serves the spirit of the UN Charter and also by stimulating existing colleges and universities to implement progress of study related to the peace science, inner and self healing as well as depolluting human mind.
91. To cooperate with authorities at various levels in implementing especially the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
92. To collaborate in the work of existing and functional organizations that have stated goals and purposes similar to the University.
93. To propose to other educational associations, programmes on peace problems that are flexible in nature and capable of being adopted and modified according to cultural background, environment, and changing needs of people.
94. To update educational means for the reciprocal disseimination of culture and the elimination of illiteracy.
95. To collaborate, affiliate and federate with other Governments, agencies and bodies for implementing the projects of developmental nature all over the world.
96. To raise and borrow money for the purpose of the university in such a manner as may be decided from time to time to prescribe the consultancy fees, charges, grants in aid etc.
97. To purchase, take on lease or exchange, hire or otherwise acquire properties, movable or immovable and rights and privileges all over the world, which may be deemed necessary or convenient for the benefit of the university and to sell, lease, mortgage, dispose or otherwise deal with all or any part of the property of the University.
98. To open branches, chapters and constitutent centres in different parts of the world and get them registered with appropriate authorities if needed and felt conducive for the attainment of the aims and objects of the University.
99. To invest the money of the university not immediately required in such securities and in such manner as may be decided from time to time, the money especially collected through subscriptions,fees, gifts, endowments, donations, grants etc.
100. To finally provide education that prepares students for leadership and social responsibility teaching them to think and communicate effectively and develop a global awareness and sensitivity for a better global understanding, world peace and unity.
Income of the University
The income and the property of the University shall be utilized only for the purpose of the objects of the University as set forth above and no portion of the fund shall be directly or indirectly diverted to any other organisation or person. This would identify the University as a Non Profit Making Organisation.

Powers and Functions of the University
Without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing powers of the management and control, the University shall have and may consider necessary or desirable for or in connection with the purposes of the University:
a) To purchase, hire, take on lease, land, movable or immovable properties and assets anywhere in the world, accept gifts, grants or loans on such terms and conditions and subjects to the payment of interest or otherwise as the University may consider necessary.
b) To enter into contracts, agreements and arrangements with any including the Government authorities, municipal, local and others for the purpose of obtaining concessions, privileges or other benefits or which may seem condusive to carrying out all the objects and purposes of the University or any of them to obtain and carry out, exercise and comply with any such contracts, agreements or arrangements.
c) To borrow or receive money with or without security or secured by bonds, mortagages, or other securities charged on the undertaking of all or any of the assets of the University.
d) To deal with, sell, mortagage, charge, lease, invest, open bank accounts, advance loans against adequate security and generally deal with the fund or any part thereof as the University may decide and consider desirable or necessary.
e) To invest money of the University in such a manner and in such investments as the University may in their absolute discretion from time to time deem fit so to be in confirmity with any law or provision of the relevant acts of the Government.
f) To open, operate and close such accounts with any bank or banks as the University may deem necessary.
g) To manage the University’s fund and to collect and recover interest, dividends and income thereof and to pay throughout the expenses for collection and other outgoings if any.
h) To pay or utilise the balance of such interest and dividends and income of the University and if the University so desires, to utilise the corpus of the University’s Fund if any or part thereof for the University purposes.
i) To maintain separate Society/Trust for facilities like provident funds, pension funds, or any other fund for the support or relief or maintenance of any employee or class of employee either full time or part time of the Society or their dependents or any other person/persons.
j) To institute, defend, compound, compromise or abundon any legal proceedings by or against the University or its officers or otherwise concerning the assets of the University and also to compound and allow time for payment or satisfaction of any debt due to be paid and claim or demands by or against the University.
k) To refer matters to arbitration.
l) To engage the services of any person or persons upon such remuneration and terms as the University may deem fit, to take disciplinary action against them and also to terminate their services.
m) The University may incur all costs and expenses considered necessay for the due and efficient management, of the affairs and properties of the University.
n) To sign, endorse, transfer and negotiate all kinds of documents relating to the investment of the funds of the University.
o) To receive money and to grant receipts and discharge thereof.
p) To delegate to any person or persons all or any of the foregoing powers conferred on the University in so far as they may lawfully do, subject however to the University retaining the ultimate control and descretion over the delegates’ action conduct.
q) To transfer any funds or property of the University with objects or purposes whereof are similar to these of the University and whose income is exempt from any liability by virtue of different sections related to the non profit making organisation.
r) To frame and implement from time to time rules and regulations for the administration of the University fund and carrying out of all/any of the University purposes.
s) To organise full time, part time, weekend, correspondence and distance learning educational programmes and to confer secondary, post secondary, bachelors, masters and doctoral level degrees, diplomas and certificates in different areas and subjects.
t) To recognise degrees, diplomas and certificates of other educational bodies equivalent to those of the University.
u) To establish campuses of study, training, research and consultancy as may be required for the benefit of global society.
v) To do all such things as may be necessary for the effective functioning of the University.

Interpretation of the Object
The University is established for public benefit and accordingly the objects of the University as setforth above will be interpreted and restricted to mean such objects and purposes as are regarded in law to be of a public charitable nature.

The University Open to All
a) The University shall be open to persons of either sex and of whatever race, caste, creed or class and no test or condition shall be imposed as to religious belief and professions in admitting or appointing members, students, teachers, workers etc.,
b) No benefaction shall be accepted by the University which in its opinion involves conditions and obligations opposed to the spirit and objects for which this University stands for.

Properties and Assets
a) The University shall be the custodian of its properties and assets pertaining ot its constituent institutions, its administrative offices and other activities that are transferred to it by the donors and sponsors on lease or otherwise or obtained by it or constructed by it with its own funds or the grants from the State/Federal Government or any other outside agency or charitable trusts etc.
b) The University shall hold, transfer or otherwise dispose off any immovable properties so acquired and settled in for the purpose of the University provided that where such assets have been created through a grant from any agency, prior concurrence of the agency concerned will be obtained in this behalf.


r
c) any irregularity in its procedure not effecting the merits of the issue.

Disqualification
a) A person shall be disqualified for having been chosen as and for being a member of any of the authorities of the University :
1. if is of unsound mind or is deaf, mute or suffers from contagious leprosy;
2. if is an undischarged insolvent ;
3. if has been convicted by a Court of Law of an offence involving moral turpitude ;
4. if commits an act violative of the vows of ethical or moral values relating to protection of our Mother Earth.
b) If any question arises as to whether a person is or has been subjected to any disqualifications mentioned above the question shall be referred for decision to the Chancellor and his decision shall be final and binding. No suit or proceeding shall lie in any civil court against such decision.

Filling of Casual Vacancies
Casual vacancies among the members (other than ex-officio members) of any Authority or any other Committee of the University shall be filled as soon as it may be convenient by the person or the Authority who appointed or co-opted the member whose place has become vacant and the person appointed or co-opted to a casual vacancy shall be member of such Authority or committee for the residual form for which the person whose place he fills would have been a member.

Bye-Laws
Subject to the provisions of the Charter, Aims and Objects and the Rules and Bye-laws the Board of Management shall in addition to all other powers vested in it have the power to frame Bye-laws which may provide for all or any of the following matters ;
a) establishment of Departments of teaching and halls of residence ;
b) the admission of students to the University and their enrolment as such ;
c) the courses of study to be laid down for all degree, diplomas and certificates of the University ;
d) the grant of academic awards (such as degrees and diplomas and certificates) and distinctions of the University) ;
e) the fees to be charged for courses of study in the University and for admission to the examination, degrees, diplomas and certificates of the University;
f) the Institution and prescription of the conditions of the award of fellowships, scholarships, studentships medals, and prizes ;
g) the conduct of examinations, appointment of examiners, and approval and publication of results thereof ;
h) the maintenance of discipline among the students ;
i) the maintenance of discipline among the employees ;
j) the conditions of residence and health of the students of the University Campuses and levy of fee and charges ;
k) the qualifications, emoluments, method of appointment, and the determination of the terms and conditions of service of the teaching staff and other workers of the University, promotion, penalties including dismissal.
l) the constitution of pension, provident fund, insurance etc. for the benefit of the officers, teachers, adacemic staff and the other staff of the university ;
m) the establishment of special centres ;
n) the creation composition and functions of any committees or bodies which is considered necessary for the work of the university ;
o) the preparation and submission of budget estimates ;
p) the procedure for convening the meeting of any Authority or committee ;
q) the laying down of procedures to be observed at any meeting of any Authority or Committees ;
r) books and records to be maintained by the University ;
s) admission of students and their enrolments ;
t) the conduct of the business of the Authorities ;
u) all other matters which by this Charter or the Rules may be provided for by the Bye-laws.
Provided that no Bye-laws shall be made affecting the condition of residence, health and disciplines of students, admission or enrolment of students, conditions and mode of appointment or duties of examiners or the conduct or standard of examinations or any course of study without consulting the Academic Council.
Interpretation Clause
In the event of conflict of opinion with regard to interpretation of Charter or the Rules and Bye-laws the opinion of the Chancellor shall prevail.
Utilisation Clause
The income and property of the University however derived, shall be utilised solely for promoting the objects of the University as set out in this Charter.
Bar on Payments
No portion of income and property of the University shall be paid or transferred directly or indirectly by way of dividend, bonus or otherwise howsoever, by way of profit to the persons who were at any time or are members of the university or to any of them or any persons claiming through then or any of them provided that nothing herein contained shall prevent the payment in good faith of remuneration to any member thereof or other person as consideration for any service rendered to the university or for travelling or other allowances and such other charges.
Admission
The University shall be open to persons of either sex and of whatsoever race, caste, creed, class or country and no test or conditions shall be imposed as to religious belief or profession in admitting students but noting in this section shall be deemed to require the university to admit to any course of study students larger in number and or those unwilling to participate in the university activities of moral and spiritual values and to observe the vows of moral or ethical values relating to greening of mind and protection of our Mother Earth.
Funds, Accounts, Audits and Annual Report
a) the funds of the University shall be utilised solely for the purpose of the University.
b) the accounts of the University shall be maintained in the name of the University. The accounts of the University shall be kept in such forms as may be laid down by the Board of Management and shall conform to the Rules, if any, prescribed by the respective governments wherever the accounts are opened and maintained.
c) All funds belonging to the University shall be shown separately in the accounts of the University.
d) Annual reports and the audit reports shall be submitted to the Chancellor within nine months of the closure of the accounting year for the purpose of being laid down on the records of the university.
Alteration, Amendments and Additions
The rules and Bye-laws of the University may be altered amended and added by the Board of Management / Senate and should these be deemed necessary in the interests of the university or the global education programme.
Dissolution
On the winding up or dissolution of the university there shall remain, after the satisfaction of all its debts and liabilities any property whatsoever, the same shall not be paid or distributed among the members of the university or any of them but shall be donated to any other organisations having similar aims and objects.


Approval of the Charter


The Charter of The Eurasian University, Liechtenstein is hereby approved for enabling the University Authorities to conduct different academic, vocational and job oriented programmes at Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral levels.

Liechtenstein                                                                                                                 Authorised Signatory
Date :                                                                                                                             Government of the Principality of Liechtenstein

 


About the collaborators and the assisting organisation


The Global Open university Nagaland

Establishment
The Global Open University, Nagaland, legislated by the Government of Nagaland under
The Global Open University Act 2006 (Act 3 of 2006) received the assent of the Governor of Nagaland on 30th August 2006 and was notified vide Notification number Law/Act-10/2006 on 18th September 2006. The provisions of The Global Open University Act 2006 were published in the Nagaland Official Gazette on 18th September 2006 for general information.

Recognition by the university grants commission, MHRD, government of india
The Global Open University, Nagaland is empowered to award degrees as defined under Section 22 of the UGC Act 1956. The Inspection Report of the University Grants Commission, New Delhi is hosted on the UGC's website.

Campuses of the University
The Global Open University, Nagaland has established three campuses at Dimapur, Wokha and Kohima.

Dimapur Campus : The Hon’ble Chief Minister of Nagaland Mr. Neiphiu Rio inaugurated the Interim Headquarters of the University at Dimapur on the occasion of World Environment Day, 5th June 2007 and allotted the Youth Hostel Complex of the Government of Nagaland for running job oriented and vocational courses at Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral levels.

Wokha Campus : The Hon’ble Minister for Higher Education, Government of Nagaland, Dr. Shurhozelie Liezietsu inaugurated Wokha Campus of the University on 29th May 2007. The University is situated at Orchid Hills, Wokha with a view to catering to the growing needs for conducting distance education programmes for young boys and girls besides the government employees.

kohima campus : The Global Open University, Nagaland is conducting different programmes from its Kohima Campus situated at Pezielietsie Colony on High School Road. The meetings of the Governing Council, the Executive Council and other Bodies of The Global Open University are also held periodically in this campus for designing a masterplan paradigm for strengthening the cause of distance and virtual education in India in general and Nagaland in particular.

The Global Open University, Nagaland has envisaged an action plan for improving the quality of education in India. The following Bachelor's, Master's and other programmes are being conducted at present :

Programmes on Management and Commerce
Master of Business Administration
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)
M.Sc. in Insurance Business
M.Sc. in Total Quality Management
Master of Commerce (M.Com.)
Programmes on Computers and Information Technology
Master of Computer Applications (MCA)
Bachelor of Computer Applications (BCA)
M.Sc. in Information Technology
M.Sc. in VLSI Design and Technology
M.Sc. in Embedded Systems Design
M.Sc. in Digital Media Technology
Diploma in Computer Applications (DCA)
Diploma in Information Technology (DIT)
Advanced Diploma in Computer Applications (ADCA)
Advanced Diploma in Computer Applications & Prog.(ADCAP)
Advanced Diploma in Information Technology (ADIT)
Post Graduate Diploma in Computer Applications (PGDCA)
Post Graduate Diploma in Information Technology (PGDIT)
Programmes on Ecology and Environment
M.Sc. in Environmental Science (English and Hindi Medium)
M.Sc. in Disaster Management
M.Sc. in Sustainable Development
M.Sc. in Habitat and Population Studies
M.Sc. in Global Warming Reduction
M.Sc. in Pollution Control
M.Sc. in Green Business
M.Sc. in Green Technology
Programmes on Library and Information Science
Bachelor of Library and Information Science (B.Lib.I.Sc.)
Master of Library and Information Science (M.Lib.I.Sc.)
Programmes on Law and Juridical Science
Master of Laws (LL.M.) in English and Hindi Medium
M.Sc. in Criminology
M.Sc. in Forensic Science
M.Sc. in Intellectual Property Rights
M.A. in Anti-Terror Laws
Programmes on Health and Medical Sciences
M.A./M.Sc. in Yoga
M.Sc. in Health Care and Hospital Administration
M.Sc. in Medicinal Plants
Programmes on Psychology and Counselling
B.A. (Hons.) in Counselling and Guidance
M.A./M.Sc. in Mental Health
M.A. in Psychology
M.A./M.Sc. in Counselling
M.A./M.Sc. in Psychotherapy
M.Sc. in Applied Psychology
M.Sc. in Forensic Psychology
Programmes on Education
M.A. in Education
M.A. in Higher Education
M.A. in Value Education
M.A. in Health Education
M.A. in Vocational and Technical Education
M.A. in Physical Education
M.A. in Child Care and Development
M.A. in Distance Education
M.A. in Science Education
M.A. in Adult Education
M.A. in School Education
M.A. in Educational Planning and Administration
M.Sc. in Educational Technology
Programmes on Social Science Subjects
M.A. in Economics (English and Hindi Medium)
M.A. in History
M.A. in Sociology
M.A. in Trafficking Abatement
M.A. in Ethics
M.A. in Good Governance
M.A. in Planning and Development
M.A. in Dalit Studies
M.A. in Tribal Development
M.A. in Geography
M.Sc. in Peace and Global Security
M.Sc. in Disarmament Studies
M.A. in South Asian Studies
Programmes on Applied Science
M.Sc. in Dairy Science
M.Sc. in Applied Biology
M.Sc. in Remote Sensing and GIS
M.Sc. in Bioinformatics
M.Sc. in Biotechnology
M.Sc. in Nanotechnology
Programmes on Journalism and Mass Communication
M.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication
M.A. in Broadcast Journalism
M.A. in Photo Journalism
M.A. in Public Relations
Programmes on Tourism, Travel and Hospitality Mgt.
M.Sc. in Hotel Management and Catering Technology
M.Sc. in Ecotourism
M.Sc. in Tourism, Travel and Hospitality Management
Programmes related to Self Employment
M.A. in Social Work
M.A. in Women's Studies
M.A. in Rural Development
M.Sc. in NGO Management
M.Sc. in Entrepreneurship
M.Sc. in Geriatric Care
M.A. in English
Bachelor's Degrees - Hons. and General Programmes
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) General
B.A. (Hons.) in International Hospitality Admn.
B.Com. (Hons.)
B.A. (Hons.) in Social Work
B.A. (Hons.) in Women's Studies
B.Sc. (Hons.) in Environmental Science
B.Sc. (Hons.) in Information Technology (English / Hindi Medium)
B.A. (Hons.) in Economics (English / Hindi Medium)
B.A. (Hons.) in NGO Management
B.A. (Hons.) in Journalism & Mass Communication
B.A. (Hons.) in Education
B.A. (Hons.) in Physical Education

The Chancellor of The Global Open University Nagaland

Professor Doctor Priya Ranjan Trivedi (62), the world renowned environmental scientist, institution builder and management thinker has established many institutions in India and in other countries and has helped many governments in the establishment of universities, colleges and schools for teaching and research of disaster mitigation and management, environment, human rights, peace studies, sustainable development, ecological tourism, rural as well urban entrepreneurship.

He has received many national as well as international award including Fountain of Universal Peace Award of United States of America's IAEWP - Affiliated to ECOSOC of the United Nations signed by Dr. Joachim Schuster, Secretary General, World Peace Academy's Mahatma Gandhi International Award from Alabama, USA signed by the President Dr. Charles Mercieca, Academie Europeenne Des Arts, Paris Special Diplome "Ad Honores" signed by the President M. Mourice GIBERT, World Distance Learning Virtual University Administration Award from Comision De Educacion A Distancia, Madrid signed by the President, Dr. Alfonso Roldan More, Spanish Environmental Health Award of FESAMA, The Spanish Association Professionals in Occupational Health and Environment signed by the President Dr. F. Dessart, International Environmental Law Academician Award of Institut Des Affaires Internationales, Paris, Conseil Academique Award of Universite Libre Des Sciences De L'homme De Paris, UN News Award signed by the Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Lee Jon Young, Best Environmentalist Award of the International Scientific Academy of Life Universe and Nature, Toulouse, France, Alliance Universelle Pour La Paix Par La Connaissance (AUPAC) Global Award on Peace, Mercy and Tolerance Cosponsored by Association Internationale des Educateurs pour la Paix Mondiale (AIEPM), Brussels.

He has written the following books :
01. Agenda for Sustainable Development
02. Future Global Sustainable Development
03. Bio-diversity Conservation & Management
04. Bio-technology for Bio-diversity Conservation
05. Global Energy Resources and Requirements
06. Energy Policy, Efficiency and Management
07. Human Settlements and Global Change
08. Urban and Rural Settlements
09. Population Pressure, Advocacy and Poverty
10. Population, Environment & Development
11. Population Explosion and Poverty
12. Population Development Vs. Environment
13. Green and Environmental Movements
14. Global Green and Environmental Groups
15. Green Philosophy and Political Ecology
16. Eco-Philosophy and Environmentalism
17. National - Global Perspectives to Environment
18. The Earth Summit
19. Global Environmental Facility
20. Deforestation and Land Degradation
21. Desertification, Drought and Water
22. Global Climate Change
23. International Politics & Climate Change
24. Climate Changes and Sea Level Rise
25. Global Impacts of Sea Level Rise
26. Global Warming and Green House Effect
27. Global Warming - International Cooperation
28. National and Global Efforts for Saving Ozone
29. Ozone Protocols and Future Diplomacy
30. Island Development
31. Island Development & Marine Environment
32. Protected Areas and National Parts
33. Nature and Fragile Eco-system Protection
34. Wildlife and Forest Conservation
35. Endangered Flora and Fauna
36. Global and National Wilderness
37. Wilderness Management
38. Marine Environment and Pollution Control
39. Marine Environmental & Ocean Resources
40. Greenhouse Effect and Global Climate
41. Air Pollution, Acid Rain & Ozone Depletion
42. Perspectives on Global Warming
43. Toxic & Hazardous Waste Management
44. Toxic and Hazardous Waste - Risk & Trade
45. Nuclear Power : Achievements & Prospects
46. Nuclear Wastes, Tests and Nuclear Winter
47. Contemporary Natural Manmade Disasters
48. Risk Assessment and Disaster Management
49. Floods, Dambursts and Groundwater Hazards
50. Coastal and Marine Environment Pollution
51. UN Convention on the Law of the Seas
52. Earthquake and Volcanic Eruptions
53. Land Degradation, Land Slides and Rockfalls
54. Droughts, Famines and Desertification
55. Biodiversity Extinction and Deforestation
56. Biotechnology and Genetic Manipulation
57. Floods, Tropical Cyclones, Storms & Hurricanes
58. Technological Disasters
59. Mining Disasters
60. War, Chemicals and Environment
61. Introduction to Ecology and Environment
62. State of India's Environment
63. Global Environmental Issues
64. Environmental Education
65. Population and Community Ecology
66. Natural Resources Conservation
67. Environmental Protection and Law
68. Environmental Impact Assessment
69. Pollution Monitoring and Control
70. Research Methodology and Systems Analysis
71. Air Pollution
72 Water Pollution
73. Noise Pollution
74. Agricultural Pollution
75. Nuclear and Thermal Pollution
76. Marine Pollution
77. Solid Waste Management
78. Energy Resources
79. Environmental Procedure
80. Environmental Analysis
81. Basic International Environment Laws
82. International Laws on Forests
83. International Laws on Wildlife
84. International Laws on Land and Fresh Water
85. International Laws on Marine Water - Vol. I
86. International Laws on Marine Water - Vol. II
87. International Laws on Air Pollution
88. International Laws on Nuclear Pollution
89. International Laws on Toxic / Hazardous Chem.
90. International Laws on Global Commons
91. Cleaner Delhi - Cleaner India

Prof. Dr. P. R. Trivedi has visited USA, UK, Holland, Italy, Spain, Poland, Russia, Tunisia, Mongolia, Sri Lanka, Nepal, South Korea, Maldives, Mauritius, Uganda in connection with signing of MoUs with Universities and the respective Governments. He has organised international conferences on environment, alternative and complementary medicine, eco-philosophy, world peace and sustainability in many countries of the world.

Prof. Dr. P. R. Trivedi is the President of the World Institution Building Programme (WIBP), the Chairman of the Indian Institute of Ecology and Environment (IIEE) and the Indian Institute of Human Rights (IIHR). He is currently busy in helping the Government of India besides the State Governments of Nagaland for the establishment of Vocational Universities through special enactments of the State Legislatures for solving the problem of unemployment.

Prof. Dr. P. R. Trivedi holds Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral qualifications in Engineering, Management, Human Rights and Environmental Laws. The three Encyclopaedias authored by him on Environment (30 Volumes), Disaster Management (20 Volumes) and Sustainable Development (50 Volumes) are used by all the important libraries of the world.

Prof. Dr. P. R. Trivedi has designed a Masterplan Paradigm for reducing unemployment by introducing vocational education in all the Schools and Colleges throughout the world in general and Eurasian countries in particular.